By on August 13, 2007

subaru-legacy_sedan_2004_1600x1200_wallpaper_02.jpgAccording to psychologists, the middle child fights an endless, depressing battle for parental attention. So pity the poor Legacy 2.5i Special Edition, sitting between the WRX and Outback. The WRX is the pistonheads' golden child. Older brother Outback is largely credited with the family's success– despite the fact that the Legacy was Subaru's sales leader in May. The shrinks say lavishing praise on the neglected sib is the best way to cure middle child syndrome. Ah, but is the Legacy 2.5i Special Edition (SE) special enough to deserve it? 

The SE looks handsome, in a black turtle and khakis kind of way. Enthusiasts won't slow down to get a better look; but nor will status-conscious suburbanites rush to park the lower-end Legacy behind a garage door. The SE has the kind of solid, understated charm– derived from its crisp lines and aesthetic restraint– that once typified BMW and Mercedes, right down to the blacked-out window chrome.   

That said, Subaru's due on a Montel Williams' "Who's the Father of My Baby?" episode any day. Look! It's got Chrysler's nose! The hood scoop is the only remaining link between models, and the Legacy Special Edition isn't special enough (i.e. turbocharged) to have one. Who'd a thunk we'd be arguing for a fake hood-mounted air inlet? But there it isn't.   

subaru_legacy_2007_4.jpgThe restraint continues inside, almost to a fault. The switchgear and buttonology have been arranged with reachable righteousness, but it's all lost in a sea of sameness. Our test car "featured" charcoals and silver, silver and charcoal. The hazard light button sticks out nicely, as it should, and that's it. The gauges are so restrained they look delicate. What's up with that?

Nobody wants their sports sedan associated with "frail." Thankfully, the steering wheel is thick and shapely enough to allay such fears. Luckily, any remaining concerns disappear entirely when you use the SE as the gods of speed intended.

Subaru has been refining this 2.5-liter SOHC aluminum-alloy 16-valve horizontally opposed (boxer) four-cylinder engine for more than a decade,  adding an i-Active Valve Lift System, platinum-tipped spark plugs and other similar goodies continuously, year after year, with continuous consistency that would make W. Edwards Deming proud. The envelope please: 175 hp and 169 pound-feet of torque.   

The power is smooth and plentiful. As with everything Legacy, forward acceleration lives somewhere between snapping your neck and leaving you embarrassed; say, just under eight seconds from rest to 60mph. To the base model's motive capabilities, the Legacy Special Edition adds a moonroof and power seat.

subaru-legacy_sedan_2004_1600x1200_wallpaper_01.jpgAll of Subaru's cars come equipped with a stick shift, s'il vous plait. Get one, skip to the end of the review and smile. That's because all of Subie's automotive "specials" get a four-speed adaptive electronic direct-control automatic gearbox with SPORTSHIFT® manual control. Translation: you can change gears with the stick shift or not; if not, the system adapts to your driving style.

The first part is highly entertaining… for about a minute-and-a-half. For the second bit, the autobox' electronic brain supposedly adjusts the shift points and speed thereof accordingly to your driving style. Unfortunately, even after its finished studying an enthusiast's habits, it still acts like the kid in the back of the class who didn't read last night's chapter. Stomp on the gas and the tranny goes "Huh? What?" And then plays catch up.

That's fine for people who don't drive like there's a T-Rex in their rearview mirror (metaphors may be closer than they appear). But anyone who really likes to get a move on, or even thinks about running with the big dogs, will find their hand wandering back to the SPORTSHIFT. And longing for a stick.

subaru-legacy_sedan_2004_1600x1200_wallpaper_06.jpgStill, mileage you know. And it's only because the SE's so damn personable that the autobox' slushiness stands out. And slush is really where this car really shines, er, excels. Nice weather didn't permit an appropriately gooey test drive, but the Subie's symmetrical all-wheel drive system hasn't changed. So we can expect the same grippy properties from the Legacy SE that made the brand a staple in the Northeast.

On dry pavement, the system is as noticeable as an Izod shirt at a Daughters of the American Revolution ("I want your DAR!") golf tournament. Aside from the lack of bracing forward thrust, the Legacy lacks the heavy feeling one expects from a car with four wheel-drive. It's nimble enough for government work. 

No question: the Legacy SE won't thrill you like its siblings. It does, however, offer excellent utility and phenomenal bad weather stability at a family-friendly price. It does nothing truly exceptional, nor does it completely fail in any specific area. On just about every scale, the Subaru Legacy 2.5i Special Edition is a happy medium. All the little Subie needs is a better autobox and a bit more love.

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42 Comments on “Subaru Legacy 2.5i SE Review...”


  • avatar
    jkross22

    At 20k, what else is this thing competing with? A Civic/Stripped Camry/? Nothing here to get the blood boiling for sure, but maybe this is one of those rides that gets needlessly overlooked when it should be getting snapped up.

    It’s too Maytag’ish for me, but a Civic buyer – there’s a value proposition there.

  • avatar

    Sometimes, I think Al Gore invented the internet just to give me a public forum on which to effusively praise Subaru cars. I sat in one of these recently and found it to be remarkably pleasing…

    Also as to the improved autobox, whatsay CVT (yuk)? I’m interested to see what the diesel Subaru is coming out with can do, maybe they can finally get some decent mileage.

  • avatar
    Megan Benoit

    Enthusiasts won’t slow down to get a better look

    Yes they will, they’ll be checking for twin pipes and a hood scoop. And when they realize they aren’t there, they just shake their heads and drive away, sadly.

    We originally looked at the 2.5i, but one spin around the block (and through the twisty, windy park) and we were sold on the LGT. Subaru’s ability to sell these is heavily dependent on their ability to keep potential buyers out of superior models.

  • avatar
    whatdoiknow1

    The one problem that continues to plague Subaru is the “made in Japan” interior dimensions. The front seats do not have enough leg room or thigh support for a 5′ 9″ man or woman to get comfortable. I have experienced this as a passanger in just abou tall of Subaru cars; Forrester, WRX, and Legacy. In each my feet were pressing firmly against the firewall, not very comfortable for a long trip. Driving one is another matter, since I am working the pedals I find it less of a problem. Other than that and to 2 to 3 grand premium the Legacy is one fine ride.

  • avatar

    I have an ’07 Legacy Limited.

    I love the car. It is fast enough. (Yes, I want more power, I’d also kill myself with it too). It handles extremely well, as the 17 inch tires grip the road. The climate control has been good even on hot days where my car has been baking in the sun.

    For the true pistonhead who must have more than 175hp, there is the LGT, which is blazingly fast. For those who want faster, there is the STI. But if someone wants an alternative to a Camry or Accord, that handles far better than either, the Legacy is a fine car.

  • avatar
    Megan Benoit

    The front seats do not have enough leg room or thigh support for a 5′ 9″ man or woman to get comfortable.

    I can get comfortable in the driver’s seat, but the passenger seat is too close to the floor, even on the outback (it seems the latest models are even worse). Having the height adjustable driver’s seat helps, but on the passenger side, you’re screwed. My rear end does not look forward to driving more than an hour or so in it.

  • avatar
    CeeDragon

    Contrary to it’s bland exterior, the Legacys, and even the Outbacks, are a hoot to drive. They have that subtle charm that is difficult to describe, only experienced when you’re behind the wheel. For a brief period of time, I had a 330i and an Outback XT and the Outback nearly as fun to drive as the 330i, in a strange sort of way.

    Some negatives: the abysmal gas mileage because of the full-time all-wheel drive. Great when you need it, tough on your wallet. The quality of the switchgear is so-so. And new electrical gremlins, such as the poorly coded climate control software, which cycles between too cold and too hot.

  • avatar
    quiksilver180

    The front seats do not have enough leg room or thigh support for a 5′ 9″ man or woman to get comfortable. I disagree… I have an 07 STI and I’m 5’11 and I feel perfectly fine in it. My dad has driven it before and he’s 6’3 and no problems either. I’ve tried the 08 Legacy and it felt much roomier, so size shouldn’t be a problem (unless it’s in the middle region! ;-) )

    The 2.5i SE is a pretty nice car appearance wise… nothing too much, but still is setup pretty good. I haven’t driven it, but I’m sure it would be better than my brother’s 06 base Impreza. This Legacy would be good for my mom… not too much stuff inside, but all the essentials she wants.

    The 08 Legacy GT automatic is pretty sweet… yes the gearbox is a little slushy and takes a second to think what it needs to do next (which somewhat leaves you wanting a manual), but does have some pretty serious grunt… which Subaru should design a dual clutch system similar to VW’s system (much more responsive).

    A diesel model would be great, but we’ll have to wait… As for this Legacy, it’s a step in the right direction for Subaru. The Legacy is turning into one great car!

  • avatar
    SherbornSean

    $3K more than the Accord LX, which features superior transmission, ergonomics, resale value, steering feel, and mileage.

    $3K buys some wonderful snow tires.

  • avatar
    whatdoiknow1

    Megan Benoit:
    August 13th, 2007 at 2:02 pm
    The front seats do not have enough leg room or thigh support for a 5′ 9″ man or woman to get comfortable.

    I can get comfortable in the driver’s seat, but the passenger seat is too close to the floor, even on the outback (it seems the latest models are even worse). Having the height adjustable driver’s seat helps, but on the passenger side, you’re screwed. My rear end does not look forward to driving more than an hour or so in it.

    I almost had a LGT until the wife spent some passanger seat time in a friend’s Legacy. 100% deal breaker on a otherwise excellent car. The pasasnger seat is downright uncomfortable!

  • avatar

    Sherborn Sean:
    +1. I came down to an Accord and a Subaru, and what sold me on the Accord was the comfort, mileage, smoother ride and the fact that I can’t recall ever needing AWD in 26 years of living in Montreal.

  • avatar
    Ray Jaholic

    ahh… but there’s nothing like drifting in an abandoned parking lot with the beauty of AWD. Nice low center of gravity with the boxer adds to the experience.

  • avatar
    Joe O

    Megan -

    I am so dissapointed in your first comment, since you own an LGT. Do you not know that all Legacy’s have dual tail pipes? GT or not! An unforgiveable mistake on a car that is 4 years into’s it cycle….your enthusiast license just went into probation :)

    Great review and I enjoy reading about the non-enthusiast versions from time to time.

    My wife and I test drove a 5-spd 07 LGT and she had a huge grin on her face. She would definitely be in the sub-20 mpg club in that car…

    I didn’t notice the passenger seat (dis)comfort issues on my test drive, but I was focused on the warp drive sensation. Good to know about though.

    Has anyone experienced any passenger seat time in a Forester?

    On a side note: Has anyone noticed that Subaru is now promoting their factories as “Zero-landfill” status? The brochure for the Outback states that their entire factory produces less waste than the average U.S. household. Not sure how far that holds, but it sounds pretty good to me :)

    Now they just need to get their cars to actually get decent gas mileage….18/24 on a Legacy GT.

    Let me ask you: A new BMW 335xi gets…what? Answer: 19/27, with 20% more displacement and power.

    Joe

  • avatar
    Brendan

    I recently bought an Altima over a Legacy. The real-world mileage forum folks were reporting on the Legacy GT were atrocious. It was fun, yeah, but the automatic was terrible. (If I wanted to shift myself, I would have gotten something with fewer doors.)

    Subaru goes it alone. They don’t share much of anything (engines, transmissions, electronics,) with anybody, and it costs them when it comes to “ammenities”: lackluster audio, no bluetooth, low-end nav systems. And a four-speed automatic? Still? I love the WRX, but the Legacy just can’t run with the big boys, outside of northern climes.

  • avatar
    Steve Biro

    “CeeDragon:
    August 13th, 2007 at 2:07 pm

    Contrary to it’s bland exterior, the Legacys, and even the Outbacks, are a hoot to drive. They have that subtle charm that is difficult to describe, only experienced when you’re behind the wheel. For a brief period of time, I had a 330i and an Outback XT and the Outback nearly as fun to drive as the 330i, in a strange sort of way.

    Some negatives: the abysmal gas mileage because of the full-time all-wheel drive. Great when you need it, tough on your wallet. The quality of the switchgear is so-so. And new electrical gremlins, such as the poorly coded climate control software, which cycles between too cold and too hot.”

    I owned a 2001 non-turbo 2.5-liter Impreza wagon that also had that difficult-to-pin-down driving quality that you refer to. It was no WRX but it was delightfully fun to toss around and had perfectly weighted steering. Alas, I traded it in after 18 months due to abyssmal fit-and-finish and a short-term need for a pick-up truck.

    Then a couple of years ago, I rented a non-turbo Legacy sedan and, despite the slushbox, I found myself highly impressed with higher level of quality and that same fun-to-drive quotient. Like you, the letters BMW kept coming to mind.

    My Impreza reliably averaged 25 mpg. If the non-turbo Legacy will do the same, I could live with that for a few years. But 25 mpg might not be good enough, say, seven years or more down the road.

  • avatar
    SLLTTAC

    I drive a 2007 Legacy spec.B and my wife drives a 2007 LL Bean Outback. I’ve owned seven Subarus, including my favorite, the 1992 SVX LS-L. Aside from the small cabin, the biggest disappointment of Subarus sold in the USA and Canada is the lack of optional features available in other markets, including ultrasonic back up sensors, Bluetooth, 3.0 spec.B with automatic transmission, McIntosh sound systems, on and on. We’ve had two Audi A6 4.2 cars and despite Subaru’s sterling record for reliability and durability, I’m tempted to buy more Audis, even if they are less reliable and the nearest dealer is a long way off. For the money, a Subaru is a solid choice.

  • avatar
    BEAT

    Wow.. this car is very small it looks big in the outside but small in the inside. Have you driving or been inside a Subaru WRX sti? The leg room is almost the same and fuel economy forget it. you rather buy a Hummer.

    But if you hit an Audi from behind with this car you will find the Audi in the Body repair shop.

  • avatar
    gmoe

    For what it's worth I drive an 05 LGT and get nothing but praise from previous BMW/Audi owners on what you get in a Legacy for the $. GT or not. Spend a few winters in upstate NY and the value of AWD becomes very clear. When you have 2+ ft. of snow to plow through on a regular basis the fact that you don't get stellar gas mileage becomes laughable.

  • avatar
    Blunozer

    My wife’s 2002 Legacy has been rock solid since the day she bought it. Although she became envious of my 06 Miata, on snowy days the Legacy is simply unstoppable.

    Low centre of gravity + AWD = Traction for days.

    We will not trade it in. Instead it will become my winter beater.

    If you live in Canada, there is no better all around car.

  • avatar
    amcadoo

    I have a 2005 Legacy GT with 37000 miles on it. I have really enjoyed the car. I thought it had terrible mileage too (20 mpg) then I tried slowing down. It went up to 28 mpg! So you can get good mileage if you drive slowly, but then whats the point of 250 hp? The power is there when you want it.

  • avatar
    rollingwreck

    We are a multi-legacy family (2003 and 1996). Both “L” trim.. Similar to what they are calling “special edition” these days.

    Boring? Yeah, they don’t turn heads. But they both have been remarkably reliable. They are nible for their size, and of course unstoppable in winter.

    The other advantage to the base Legacies is that other than lacking HP, they are fairly well-equiped. They lack the status of the Outback or GT, and you can get blowout pricing on them (especially towards the end of the year.) A dealer around here was selling 07′s for $19k. For comparison, my ’96 purchased new off the lot was $17k.

    These cars are a true value. I always flinch when i see people paying $30k+ for an Outback…

  • avatar
    niky

    I have mixed feelings about the Legacy. I’m only 5’5″ and I still notice the tight interior… it’s not confining, but it’s something you’re conscious of. In fact, I’d say it’s fair bet a Civic has a bigger interior than this.

    The drive is nice… terrific balance (thanks to the Symmetrical AWD, which dials out that understeer that FWD competitors have) and good suspension composure, but I still prefer the steering in the Mazda6, which isn’t all that badly balanced itself, is probably quicker, and probably drinks less gas.

    Wouldn’t mind having a Legacy, though… ;)

  • avatar
    P.J. McCombs

    There’s always the “character” argument in favor of this car. The gurgling flat-four alone makes it easier to feel an emotional connection with the Legacy than a (probably superior) Accord or Altima.

    Unfortunately, “character” still includes frameless windows that clatter like junk whenever you shut the doors with them rolled half-down.

    A further bonus: base-model Subarus are dirt cheap to insure.

  • avatar
    JJ

    It’s not just the AWD causing the bad gas mileage, it’s also the boxer engine. I remember some small capacity Boxer 4 Alfa Romeos not too long ago that were known for bad mileage, even when this wasn’t the issue it is today (although, with european taxes…). Obviously a lot of people still liked the engines for their Alfa-ness and sound.

    However, now I’m thinking about it, 911s get great mileage considering their performance…

    Maybe it’s due to the relatively small size combined with the boxer setup.

  • avatar
    nichjs

    At what point does a sunroof become a moonroof? I thought moonroofs were enormous, covering most of the roof, their name implying that they’re so big as to permit moonlight (dim that it is) into the vehicle…

  • avatar
    CeeDragon


    quiksilver180:
    The 08 Legacy GT automatic is pretty sweet… yes the gearbox is a little slushy and takes a second to think what it needs to do next (which somewhat leaves you wanting a manual), but does have some pretty serious grunt… which Subaru should design a dual clutch system similar to VW’s system (much more responsive).

    Agreed! Having owned an Outback XT and currently driving a car with a DSG transmission, the two would be a match made in heaven.

    I can just imagine paddle-shifting through some heavy Midwestern snow. Whap, whap, whap!

  • avatar
    gfen

    A moon roof was a glass panel, a sunroof was asolid panel. Now they’re interchangable.

  • avatar
    Brian E

    A further bonus: base-model Subarus are dirt cheap to insure.

    Maybe the Legacy 2.5i Limited isn’t a base model, but when I shopped it it was the most expensive to insure by far – $500/year more than an Acura TSX.

  • avatar
    Steve Biro

    When I traded in my non-turbo Impreza wagon for my Ford Ranger, my insurance payments dropped by $160 a year. That may be because Ranger body panels have been in production forever and are readily available for cheap.

  • avatar
    mkirk

    A 4 speed automatic? Ugh, park it next to the close out sebrings and Tauri at the Enterprise lot…If the review is close that seems like the personality of this car anyway.

  • avatar
    ejacobs

    slushbox=no buy

  • avatar
    P.J. McCombs

    I could be wrong on the insurance… I’m basing it on anecdotal evidence: quotes I’ve gotten when considering an Impreza 2.5 RS and base Forester.

  • avatar
    Redbarchetta

    This might be my next car, with a 5-speed thou Subaru auto’s suck. I like that silver too. It is between this and an Impreza if I can get one before they turn hideous, that would make us a 2 Subaru Legacy family. I love the 2005 LGT I got my wife, but the turbo is very dangerous in my hands, err foot. I found the insurance rates on even the turbo to be not that bad, cheaper then the older Cadillac by $150. Now if I can just find a way to get rid of that barely running Cadillac so I can drive a more reliable Subaru in the rain instead of my motorcycle.

    Interior room is comperable to an Accord or Camry, or my wife would never have let me buy it because she wouldn’t have been comfotable.

  • avatar
    Jim H

    I have a 2006 Legacy GT spec-B. It’s awesome. Mileage in the winter during snow storms is in the low 20′s…but in the summer, like now, I’m getting 28.8 miles per gallon between oil changes (3750 miles)…that’s incredible. Some general rules apply, you don’t have to get up to red line in between stop lights…at least not every single one. You also don’t have to go more than 80 or you’ll have to pay a bit more in gasoline charges. However, nothing surprises a crotch-rocketer more than pulling away from a green light with him…and staying with him until he realizes you have the GT…not the I. :) Then he smokes ya! :D

  • avatar
    Terry Parkhurst

    The Subaru Legacy is to one generation what the Tri-5 Chevrolet (1955-’57) remains to another: a canvas upon which to paint one’s vision of how an automobile should be.

    Seating is tight, reflecting the fact that Subarus differ from Tri-5 Chevrolets in that they’re built to go around corners, not just in a straight line. The Subaru Legacy GT spec B is the best variant of the Legacy’s legacy. It’s quick, it corners as if it is on rails and the looks are appealing but ready for customizing. Best of all, it’s much more affordable and easier to maintain than what the Germans have to offer in this class (sport sedan).

    Years from now, we may see it being driven down the street in Reno, during Hot August Nights 2027.

  • avatar
    mlbrown

    I'm new here, folks, but I figured I'd post for this thread because I drive a Subaru, and I think I can shed some light on this mysterious Subaru feeling. My 1998 Impreza L 2.2 just turned 180,000, and I've been poking around for a new, or at least newer, car for a few months now. The choice is not easy. I though brand loyalty would come into play, and I would just march down to the Subaru dealership and buy another Subaru, probably a Legacy 2.5i, but then there's the Mazda6, the TSX and a couple of others that would probably be better is some ways. I drove a TSX and it was a blast, and really, it's at the top of my list. The thing about Subaru is their cars, or at least most of them, are more than just reliable. They are nearly indestructable…in the same way that my 1981 Volvo 240 was, and while other cars may be just as reliable on paper, I get the feeling that they wouldn't be on the road. My wife and I had a 1991 Legacy turbo for a bunch of years, and it just soaked up the miles we sold it with almost 300,000 on the clock. I've had other reliable cars, even a V6 Camry, but with Subaru, you don't get the "almost broken" signs from anything that isn't a wear item. Nothing rattles or squeaks, or rubs and thumps. My impreza is rolling with its entire original cooling system, front end, exhaust system, clutch, transmission, electrical system, fuel system, etc. None of these components has so much as complained. Plus, a Subaru will pretty much take a shotgun blast standing up, and will remain operational when other cars would be on the side of the road. It's things like that that have me considering the Legacy, which comparatively slow. Matt

  • avatar
    jabdalmalik

    Does anyone know Subaru’s market share in northeastern states? I know whenever I visit Vermont it seems that one in five cars on the road is a Subaru.

  • avatar
    dgduris

    Funny the the Legacy was the sales leader in May. I wonder if that was due to a lack of Outbacks. It would make the mistake of axing the Legacy GT wagon very apparent, very quickly.

    I am on my 5th Subaru – a Legacy GT- Spec B. I have had dos SVXs (brilliant, brilliant car – but too high-falutin’ for Subaru in 1992) a Legacy GT (1997) an Outback VDC H-6 and the current. I will tell you that they are as great to drive in San Diego as they are in Providence, dependable enough to make all of my German-autoed friends blush when they ask me to pick them up or drop them off at “Der Autobahrn” and – given the right dealer – as enjoyable an experience to own as a Lexus.

  • avatar
    goatman2

    I recently traded my 2004 Dodge Magnum for a Subaru Legacy 2.5 SE. While I must agree that the front seats are not as roomy as some other cars, when you compare specs and actually drive the Legacy, you will soon see why these cars are so good.
    It rides like it is on rails. The handling and ride are by far the best in its class.
    The quality of the interior is also far superior to any US car.
    I have put almost 3000 miles on my car in only 2 months and have averaged 30+ MPG. Try to find something similar for the same price! The closest in Audi.

  • avatar
    fishandring

    I own a 2008 legacy 2.5i limited. I have had it about one week now and it has already 1000 miles on it. It is my 3rd Subaru but my first legacy.

    I read numerous comments before posting. Its obvious when people have not cross-shopped a Subaru recently. The interior in the newest Subaru’s is far improved and the Legacy is terrific on the inside. The mileage really isnt that bad. I’ve gone through 3 tanks now. The first was TONS (re:hours) of idling and all in town. It got 21mpg. The 2nd tank was 90% highway averaging about 10% over the speed limit and no wind. It got 28.1mpg (real mpg, not the trip computer which always seems to be about .5 off). The latest tank was about 95% highway, but in 25mph winds averaging about 15% over the speed limit. I got 25.7mpg.

    The interior is a little smaller than its competitors but nothing drastic. My wife and 2 kids were plenty comfortable on 660 mile trip.

    The handling is typical superb Subaru even if it lacks on power. They must have tweaked the automatic for 2008 because it drives like a charm. Most people dont realize, if you want more power just slap the stick over to the “manual” mode and DONT shift. This puts it in sport mode where it moves much speedier but still does the shifting for you. The WIDE 17″ tires are great on the road.

    The price arguements from people is BS from people that do not even crossshop the Subarus. Lets compare:
    Edmunds TMV – Camry 2008 XLE
    - add heated seats, leather, stability control
    TMV WITH current $1000 incentive comes to $24500
    Most do not realize that you can get a legacy with very little (or none if you are a VIP partner) haggling for 2 or 3% BELOW invoice. The ONLY car you cannot get below invoice is the STI.

    So here is what I paid for the SAME features.
    Legacy Limited 2.5i -
    + auto-dimming mirror, security system, armrest extension.
    $21938 after the $1500 incentive that just expired.
    At that price point what is the car missing vs. the Camry? Premium audio and bluetooth.

    But you gain far superior handling and safety. I would gladly take that for the swipe on the audio. I can upgrade the audio myself for cheaper anyway…

    Want to cross-shop the Altima? Sorry, you can’t. They dont offer luxury in a smaller engine in the Altima.

    How about the accord? To get the same features you will need to buy the EX-L. This adds a Satellite option that I did not purchase. What is the price?
    Edmunds TMV says $25233.
    Mine was what?? $21938 + 350 (for the satellite option I did not get).

    That $3k difference will buy you a LOT of gas…

    Residuals are moderately different but Subaru as a brand has a sligtly higher residual than Toyota and a moderately lower residual than Honda. This makes the Legacy a superb buy.

  • avatar
    PSRp

    I’m a Los Angeles based Legacy driver, and they are RARE in this town! I just spent a couple of weeks in Boston and Vermont; how many Subarus can you count per block? MANY MANY. Every model. Hmmm…I wonder if climate could be a factor? But besides that, this is my 4th Legacy. They FEEL good. They DRIVE like nothing else and have a certain inimitable feel. There is an idiosyncratic Subaru thing that’s hard to get if you don’t get it. And I’ve been an unhappy Audi owner due to poor reliability. That’s never a Subaru issue. I hope Fuji stays with the program and doesn’t slick ‘em up too much. They’re beautifully engineered vehicles, superbly balanced and the designers attend to lots of important details in the automotive realm. I would like a few more interior amenities, but hope the Subie cabin designers don’t lose sight of the engineering to grab for more middle class market share. That’s what keeps the fan base dedicated. In L.A., it is all about status and Teutonic heft, where people feel better about themselves when they overpay; people who drive Subarus know what they’re about. I don’t think that cute little black & blue badge from Bavaria is worth the extra $20k. But that’s just me.

  • avatar
    Janis46

    I wish I found this site before I bought my 08 Legacy. I hate this car makes to much road noise and the driver seat is lousy. I have owned this car for 2 1/2 years and I can’t stand it to small to loud and now I am getting bad gas miles trying to figure that one out.

    I will be looking to trade this in over the summer!!!!!


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