By on August 1, 2007

front2.jpgSince 1859, Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution has challenged religious fundamentalism. Forget Adam and Eve. Humans started as random spices in a primordial soup. Natural selection took us from soup to trees, trees to cars. And then Ferdinand Porsche created a mutant Volkswagen. Since its inception, the 911 has been evolution’s four-wheeled poster child, moving quickly from an oversteer monster to a supersonic pussycat. And then, on the seventh day, Stuttgart created the latest Turbo, a car so capable that driving it is a biblical revelation.

Walking up to my loaded lender, I realized that the more things stay the same, the more they change. The Turbo still wanders the line between “normal” and “steroidal” with delicious subtlety, advertising its alpha status with the kind of nonchalance one associates with closeted superheroes– and TV serial killers.

wheels.jpgIf natural selection dictates aero-friendly styling, artificial selection demands the return of the bug eyes. And there they are. Meanwhile, the Turbo moves the styling needle towards the temper of the times: Bauhaus bling. Clock the split-level induction ducts in the rear quarters and the new, “Audi-inspired” LED’s in the snout.

Nineteen inch two-tone rims (revealing epic brake discs) and a subdued spoiler indicate function, while Bette Davis’ eyes and Bettie Page’s hips project the iconic form. The Turbo’s wheels are by far the most “distinctive” yet offered as stock. To my eyes the fifteen-spoke Ferrari-esque pentagrams are the only miscue in an otherwise perfectly judged stealth wealth gestalt.

boost.jpgOpen the Turbo’s door and the six figure price tag is well represented. Illuminated door sills greet, leather aromas intoxicate. The Turbo’s build quality and material choices offer haptic harridans Teutonic titillation. All the buttons and switchgear click with infinite precision, nestled within their intuitive homes. The Turbo’s low-slung sport seats hug your hide while the side bolsters holster your spare tire. Digital ICE rends Floyd asunder through thirteen channels. While Dr. B’s boom box isn’t as orchestral as Lexus’ Levinson unit, Turbo owners won’t care until at least their third oil change.

Twist the Ned Flanders-friendly ignition and life breathes into the miraculous mill through twin-intercooled turbines. (THAT’S what you paid to hear.) The horizon takes on a bi-xenon hue as you slot first. Loop your thumbs over the spokes at nine and three, mash the gas and the world begins to look like the Matrix. The seats give a little before they don’t; keeping you locked and loaded.

side2.jpgThe last Turbo I sampled was of the calf-master floor-mount clutch variety. It provided an ideal setup for three pedal track tangos, but felt like three left feet when negotiating a city grid. The new Stiletto-savvy pedal positioning and lighter clutch uptake make pothole-piloting and Honda parking a piece of piss. Yes, well, even a gentle tickle on the go-pedal provides an unequivocal indication that this car is built to be driven hard and put away wet. 

As enthusiasts of a certain age will tell you, waiting for big blowers to spool up sucks. I’m pleased to report that Porsche’s professors nixed the problem in the low-rpm bud by blending Variable Turbine Geometry (VTG) and VarioCam Plus. VTG modifies the planes directing exhaust gases to the turbine so that low rev launches are fully spooled. Those planes then change as the big tach needle in front of you flickers by, keeping optimum boost primed. VarioCam Plus keeps the twist on tap through two different cam profiles; city schlepping and Bahn burning. 

zoom.jpgThe new Turbo Porker’s 3.6-liter flat six stables 480 apocalyptic horses. When dispatched, over 500 pounds of twist try to eat Mother Earth. In manual trim, rest to sixty arrives almost before it arrives: 3.7 seconds. Endure cries of wuss, and the Tiptronic S gets there .3 seconds earlier. To keep all that power from going up in ZR-rated Holy Smoke, an all new electronic controlled multidisc AWD system ensures forward motion.

There are very few cars that mind meld with the driver as quickly and easily as the new 911 Turbo. Look, point, accelerate. Wipe stupid grin from face and repeat. I’m told there’s a bit of understeer out there, somewhere. Didn’t see it. In fact, this car is so easy to drive at such stupendous speeds that within minutes I was thinking Matthew “Schumacher” had a nice ring to it. When your ego gets the better of you (and it will) Porsche Stability Management (PSM) steps in to save your bacon. 

hisandhers.jpgThe new 911 Turbo is the fastest, friendliest and safest evolution yet– at least until the Turbo S arrives. Why in the world anyone would want to make this car any faster is beyond me. But then this is the company that has done more than any other to ensure that well-heeled speed freaks can procreate. That is, if their Porker’s ever parked long enough for them to bother.

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61 Comments on “Porsche 911 Turbo Review...”


  • avatar
    GS650G

    Porsche – There is no substitute.

    At the end of the day if you have the means I strongly recommend it.

    It was true in Risky Business 20 years ago as today.

  • avatar
    nichjs

    a lexical delight, matthew, thankyou!

  • avatar
    mrcknievel

    Porsche – There is no substitute.

    At the end of the day if you have the means I strongly recommend it.

    It was true in Risky Business 20 years ago as today.

    BOO! Ferris Bueller’s Day Off was the source of that statement! :-)

    Great review

    The 911 Turbo is without a doubt my dream sports car….really…is there ANY sports car that does EVERYTHING so well?

  • avatar
    cyclopticgaze

     Good write up I guess, but no talk of handling or braking? Assuming there's understeer is a bit of a shortfall when reviewing a $100k+ car.

  • avatar
    SherbornSean

    Funny review!

    I do think the retro thing may have jumped the shark, though, what with sales of the Beetle, Mustang and PT falling.

    Can’t help but wonder what this drivetrain would be like in the Cayman, rather than a car that spends so much energy trying to overcome its design.

    But given that Porsche has decided to devote its engineering resources to hybrid SUVs and luxury sedans, we’ll never know.

  • avatar
    tincanman99

    I drove one of these bad boys a few months ago. This car is beyond fast but as docile as a pussycat around town. The best part is unlike Ferrari’s cars which have ridiculous maintenance requirements this thing will probably outlive all of us. Porsche’s have always been meant to be driven and NOT be garage queens.

    We will probably never seen this powertrain in the Cayman as Porsche wants to keep this car at the top of the feeding chain. Lets be realistic the 911 is Porsche. The 911 defines what this company is as opposed to the Cayenne and the upcoming Panamerica which is designed to empty out stupid yuppies pockets.

  • avatar
    jurisb

    Porsche is not only agile ,fast and detailed. it is also smallish , dwarfish like some latvian annual budget. it is also damn boring. no other company has copied themselves so much like some brazilian soap opera. the facial countenace of porsche is make-up corrected old wrinkles of 60ies. Not a single vibe daring. this niche player offers tastes that only the chicane
    gourmets would enjoy, smacking their lips in g- force delight. Takes a latest pentium inside to muster out which is the previous gen, and which the lates one. Porsche has always given us the great meny of barely 2 dishes. they have managed to sell their scarce diversity in a nicely wrapped satin engine and leather scarf. at least they have managed to overcome their amateur 911 butt- less designs, with amateur interior finishes, with half hidden speakers, oldtimer gauges, etc.
    Would I personally go for Porsche? no.
    I need a justified price for every sweated dollar, i need brutish ,juicy finished designs, and i won`t overpay just because the leather is ripped off from milka cows in the Alps.
    I need modern looking vehicle with matrix sculpted chisels, with new design horizons, and a car without grandma genes bulging through front headlights…….

  • avatar
    seldomawake

    Great article, excellent alliteration! I’m envious that you got to dance around in one of these…

  • avatar
    Ray Jaholic

    ???!!!

  • avatar
    BigChiefMuffin

    Nice review – the only points I would take issue with is that, for this price, the interior really isn’t that special, as it is pretty much the same as a normal 911 and not that far removed from the Boxster below it. Aston, Bentley & Maserati all do this thing better.

    The other issues is build qualit/reliability. The 996 was a very unreliable car, with lots of engine problems ( especially the 3.4 ). Not clear yet whether the 997 has cured this – and with a Porsche, if it does go wrong, it normally is big bucks to repair…

  • avatar

    “Can’t help but wonder what this drivetrain would be like in the Cayman, rather than a car that spends so much energy trying to overcome its design.”

    Sad that Porsche has put itself in a box relative to the superb and even better looking Cayman. The mid-engine chassis is inherently more stable than the 911, yet still says Stuttgart from every angle. Yet for all of the enthusiast wailing over the Cayenne and the Panamera, it’s apparent that Porsche still delivers the goods. I’m still at a loss to understand the need for the uprated horsepower of cars like the Turbo and ZO-6 as it takes a rare level of driving skill to make either dance on a racetrack faster than their more plebian stablemates.

    Great review, Frank – “offer haptic harridans Teutonic titillation”, indeed!

  • avatar
    TreyV

    As I was reading, I wondered to myself if this is the one with the variable pitch induction blades. And then you told us it was. The first time I read about that system, I peed myself a little bit.

  • avatar
    MgoBLUE

    I had the priviledge of riding in an ’05 Turbo S Cabriolet several times with a friend. It literally defies the laws of physics. As hard as my back was pressed against the seatback, I was amazed that the bolts in the floor were able to keep the seat in place. That is, until we locked up the brakes (for fun) and I was even more amazed that the seat and I didn’t go shooting through the windshield.

    What is it about the 911 Turbo and M3 that give them such a beautiful exhaust note? Is it really “twin-intercooled turbines”?

  • avatar
    Megan Benoit

    I suppose if I’m paying that much for a vehicle, it’d better have a gold-plated interior and do my laundry, at the very least. I know it’s a Porsche, but sheesh… I’ll have to file this under “Super fast cars I’ll never be able to afford.”

  • avatar
    bfg9k

    Ok, 911 question: on the old aircooled models they used a big fan to pull air into the engine compartment through the vents on the rear lid.

    Where do they stick the radiator on the watercooled models, and how do they get enough airflow through it? I’d go over to the local Porsche dealer and look for myself but it’s not the kind of place that seems to invite people poking around the engine bay of their $100k cars.

  • avatar
    Gottleib

    You lost me with,
    “The last Turbo I sampled was of the calf-master floor-mount clutch variety. It provided an ideal setup for three pedal track tangos, but felt like three left feet when negotiating a city grid. The new Stiletto-savvy pedal positioning and lighter clutch uptake make pothole-piloting and Honda parking a piece of piss.”
    Other than that enjoyed the ride and I am glad we now have a 5 star review.

  • avatar
    red5

    The radiators (and there are a few) are mounted in the front.
    I have driven, on two occations, the previous 996, and I can attest it is a scary beast. Mash the pedel and it warps space and time.

  • avatar
    adrift

    An infinitely capable car, no doubt. But give me a GT3. Or better yet, a GT3 RS. Or better yet still…a Cayman with the GT3 drivetrain!

  • avatar
    carguy

    This is the only super car you’ll ever need. Ferraris, Lambos and Ford GTs are a pain to live with and do more to announce your self esteem deficiency issues than provide daily driving enjoyment. The Porsche is every bit as capable and can be enjoyed every day without broadcasting your car narcissism to everyone within a two block radius – a true drivers car that meant to be driven and not admired by less fortunate bystanders. And as a bonus its a good deal cheaper.

  • avatar
    johnf514

    A great review befitting of a great car.

    Tiptronic beating stickshift by .3 seconds? Has a day of reckoning arrived?

  • avatar
    carlisimo

    “Porsche Turbo Review”

    Reminds me of those people who don’t know what model car they have. “I have a Mercedes.” “A Mercedes what?” “A Kompressor.” “Good for you.”

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    So, who shops at the Ned Flanders Leftorium?

    This is one of very few cars that drills this kind of image deep into the brain:
    It’s 1000 miles to Mexico. The cops have been left in the dust. The blonde is attached to the arm and loving the speed. You’ve just gotten lucky with both the car and the blonde…life is good.

    Man I need a 911 Turbo…

  • avatar
    whatdoiknow1

    I have very fond memories of driving a 1986 911 Turbo. What a beast of a sports car; under 3000lbs, non-power steering, no ABS, 4spd gearbox, turbo lag all the way up to 3000rpm. But what a blast when the boast kicked in, can you say afterburner!

    Back in the days the 911 Turbo was king in acceleration, just about the only car avaialble that could consistantly pull sub 5 second 0 to 60 runs when most other cars in its class had a hard time breaking the 6 second barrier. Porsches were once actually special because of their performance, not just he name.

    What is this thing that we call a 911 Turbo today? Is it a GT or a sportscar? Why is it so damn big and heavy(for a Porsche)? OK it is still extremely fast and it does handle but to what purpose? Is it actually fun or is it what it appears to be a silly rich boy toy that is a better conversation piece than actual sportcar.
    “I paid sooo much for it”
    “It can top out at over 190mph, although that is stictly academic”

    Honestly this car and many like it in its price range are just plain stupid today. Like someone mentioned earlier it is almost impossible to even make use of it power on the track. How long until we have a 1000hp 911 Turbo and than a 1500hp version after that?

    The gig is up! There really isn’t any higher for Porsche to go in its attempt to outrun the masses. Face it, today a Camry SE v6 will smoke a base boxster of the line! Yes, I have seen it done! I have also witnessed a e55 pull away from Carrera4s at speed. An Evo with a few grand in aftermarket stuff will be more than a match for this new Turbo, WTF!

    I guess Porsche really needs to become just like any other luxury car maker today because their future dominance in the sportcars market is truly in doubt.

  • avatar
    Stephan Wilkinson

    Somebody early on posted that “Porsche: there is no substitute is fro “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off,” not “Risky Business.”

    Wrong.

    Tom Cruise said it (it was Porsche’s ad slogan at the time) after blowing off some thugs while driving his father’s 928. There were no Porsches in Ferris Bueller, only a [phony Chevy-engine] Ferrari replica.

  • avatar
    adrift

    Technology advances while physics does not. As technology has improved, people can go faster for less money; thus the wicked fast Evo. But you can only go so fast without an ever increasing need for increasingly more power. On the one hand you complain about 1000 HP, and the next you complain about Evo’s being as fast as the 911 Turbo. Which is it that bothers you? Because to avoid the latter, you have to have the former. Performance compression has occured and isn’t going away until some fundamental change in technology occurs, if that can even change things substantially due to the fact humans can only react so fast and stand so many G’s.

    The place your extra Porsche performance dollar serves you now is in more subtle levels of capability…and endurance. Porsches are still some of the only cars that you can take to the track totally stock, drive hard all day, and go home with a car that functions as well at the end of the day as at the start (without major maintenance).

    As for the quote, isn’t it half from Risky Business (the “no substitute” part) and half from Ferris (the “if you have the means” part)?

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    whatdoiknow1 – if I can add to what you’ve posted…
    Sitting in a relative’s garage in mint condition is a 1984 Porsche 911 Cabrio. It has under 10,000 miles on it and it just needs a carwash and a fresh coat of wax to make it look great again. I keep thinking (when peeling though the corners with the top down) that the days of needing guts and skill to handle a 911 are long gone. I guess only an Elise will give the “OH CRAP” feeling of losing the tail end in a sharp curve. This older 911 is just fun. It’s still the raspy air cooled engine, zilch for electronics, and the classic “WTF” for button locations.
    While BMW and Mercedes might be a lost cause, wouldn’t you like to see Porsche just make a stripper 911 targa or cabrio? You know, strip out the fluff except for the federal requirements, the whaletail on the back, and give us a 2500lb real Porsche? Who needs a $1000 chrono package or $2500 matching whatevers? Strip it – make it light – make it scary – make it fun – make it real again. Please???

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    “Twist the Ned Flanders-friendly ignition ”

    Brilliant

  • avatar
    Lumbergh21

    Adrift:
    I think you got the quote right. I remember Matthew Broderick looking at the camera and delivering the “If you have the means…” line, and it was in reference to a Ferrari. It’s been much longer since I last saw “Risky Business”, but I do remember that he trashed a Porsche (rolled into a pond/lake) in the movie.

    Love the Ned Flanders line.

    For a while my wife owned a 1969 Porsche 911T. It was over 25 years old when she bought it, and while hardly the marvel that modern Porsches-or for that matter many other cars-are, I have to admit, it exuded a certain feeling when you were riding along or driving it. I say this now, though I would never admit it to my wife then or now, I was impressed by that old 911T and would love to have another more modern one now. I am not a Porschephile, but they seem to offer something more that you don’t get with other sports cars. Something that I can’t quantify, but I can feel. While my wife has since moved on to a more responsible car, Cobra Mustang, she still yearns for a Porsche and the indescribable feeling that went with it. Porsches just seem to offer a certain smoothness and feeling of confidence that can not be found in most, if not all, other sports cars.

  • avatar
    Megan Benoit

    Tiptronic beating stickshift by .3 seconds? Has a day of reckoning arrived?

    Not news. Most DSG autos beat manuals because they can shift faster than any human can. Granted, I don’t know the specifics of the auto tranny in the Turbo, but I do know that certain ones can best manual shifting.

  • avatar
    stuki

    After a fast dessert run in a 996 gt2, I really started questioning the gains from sticking ever more powerful engines way back in these short wheelbase cars. The 997 might be different, the 4 wheel drive gear and attendant forward weight shift might make a difference, and so might a better driver, but that ‘top of the line’ gt2 sure started using road width as speed climbed (Tires, actually the whole car, were almost new and pressures double checked, alignment did not feel at all funny at ‘low’ speed, but was not measured).

    On a racetrack, where lane width is less of an issue, the surface is grippier and less bumpy, there is no center crown for water runoff and officials shut down the ‘fun’ if wind gets too strong, this is probably less of an issue. And in twisty California canyons, speeds are never high enough to require any real high speed stability anyway. But then again, in that scenario, the extra horsepower over a regular 911, not to mention cheaper gt3, isn’t all that useful, either.

    For comparison, on that day in the dessert, a DB9, although slower and softer, tracked the same roads straight as an arrow. As soon as actual turns arrived, it was matter of factly left for dead with cooked brakes, but as a straight road, high speed ‘blonde on the arm, 1000 miles to Mexico’ kind of car, it sure showed a lot nicer than the Porsche. Some experience in an M6, leads me to believe that one would have, as well. Based on that, and allowing for possible alignment problems and me simply not being sufficiently in touch with my inner Walter Rohrl, I think Porsche should have kept the 928 line around as a mega motor, GT style car, instead of relying on increasingly hopped up 911’s. Even allowing for undoubtedly marvelous engineers, once the stakes get high enough, betting with physics, instead of against it, is likely the positive expectation play.

    Truth be told, I know Porsche does not market these cars as multiples of speed limit open road cruisers, but rather as civilized enough road cars that works well (according to marketing guys, spectacularly so) on track days. Maybe it’s just me, but isn’t it more of a hassle to properly track prep the road car you arrived in, and then after the session is over, road prep it again, than it would be to simply keep a separate, more focused car, either at the track, or on a trailer? Then you’d have a track car with a real roll cage, racing seats and no roof liner to scuff up with a helmet; not to mention one that weighed half as much and didn’t have to comply with all manners of track irrelevant regulations. And you’d have less concern about warranty coverage, and about feeling like a complete asshole for downplaying track usage to the young pistoneros drooling to buy the car off you when the next, even more powerful, model arrives.

  • avatar
    guyincognito

    “Honestly this car and many like it in its price range are just plain stupid today. Like someone mentioned earlier it is almost impossible to even make use of it power on the track.” Oddly, this is exactly what makes me want one.

  • avatar
    chuckR

    For those lamenting the old days of lighter Porsches with ‘interesting’ handling. Panorama magazine had an article on a guy who a few years ago commissioned a lightweight Porsche for the road. Took an older tub, stripped and strengthened it, probably replaced a bunch of glass with plastic, etc, etc and wound up with a 1900# car. The rear tires were huge, it had giant flares and most intimidating, it used a flat fan 962 engine, detuned to 390+/- hp. Not sure I’d even want to get in that one as a passenger and certainly I don’t feel up to it as a driver. But what a car.

  • avatar
    whatdoiknow1

    In today’s automotive marketplace if someone has the means the choices they have in terms of performance cars is mindblogging! Today I can go down to the local Whatever car dealership and buy any number of 25G family sedans that will do the quarter mile in 15 seconds or less, top out at over 130mph, pull over .80g will ease, and brake from 70mph in less than 180ft.
    Performance like that was resevred for expensive specialty cars (Porsche, Corvette, Ferrari , etc) not too long ago.

    There was once a time when you actually needed a small, cramped, compromised “sportscar” to even think of achiving this level of performance. Today in all honesty the whole idea of a sportscar is indeed in question.

    I have been driving for over 20 years and as far as I can see the roads are still the same as they were back then, but they are far more crowded. Hey for that matter the road and race tracks in my neck of the woods are also no different than they were 20 years ago.
    It is no wonder that just about every racing series in the world is doing whatever it can to limit performance to real world levels that can actually be used “constructively”.
    There is a reason that a Top-Fuel dragster looks the way it does it would not work any other way.

    “So called” high-end sportscars are evolving into some rather strange beast; 4000lbs+ for a 2 seat car, WTF? Necessary traction and stability control to tame a car with 315 40 ZR 19 tires!
    These aren’t sportcars anymore, I dont know what to classify them as today.

    BTW; 0 to 60 in 3.6 seconds and the quarter in less than 13 is downright scary on a regular road, it is not much fun. Yeah, in your minds it might sound like a blast but in real life it feels like the driver is just along for the ride like the guy sitting in the passanger seat.

    Now don’t get me wrong I love fast cars, or I would not be here. But I enjoy fun cars much much more. IMO there is a point were you can add too much power to a car and destroy what was truly enjoyable about driving. Driving a F1 car on a track is more work than enjoyment.

  • avatar
    Johnson

    The 911 always has been, and looks set to continue to be the swiss army knife of sports car. It does everything, and everything well. No truer is this statement than applied to the new Turbo.

  • avatar
    paykan GT

    ‘woos’ please, it’s ‘wuss’

  • avatar
    Aardappel

    I have rather mixed feelings towards porsche. Never having driven one, I have to go by reviews on how desireable they are, and they are rather contradictory. For every review that declares a certain porsche as the best handling car ever, I see mentions of scary lift off over-steer etc.

    Take the GT3, by connaisseurs rated the best ever (wasn’t it #1 on this very site?) Yet it has the same silly rear-weight distribution, super sticky tires which grip… and then suddenly don’t, and more pronounced problematic RWD behaviour (lift throttle oversteer). Doesn’t sound like the ideal car to me.

    So am I missing something? Are porsches really that good, or only for expert drivers? Myself, a rather mediocre driver, would I find any of these porsches highly controllable and forgiving, or would I just get myself wrapped around a tree the moment my clumsy driving induces lift throttle oversteer and my reaction to correct it is all wrong?

    Right now I drive a Z, which certainly in my book handles rather nicely and is moderately forgiving (I have dome plenty of “spirited driving” in it). But for any next car I get, being faster than the Z is rather low on my list of requirements, any extra money I spend should go towards even better handling, and in particular, controllability/predictability for a mediocre driver. Porsche comes to mind as a logical choice, except for the doubts above. Maybe for mediocre drivers cars with “RWD with occasional AWD” like the GT-R’s attessa ets (sp?) is more forgiving… I certainly want RWD handling, as understeering scares me even more than at least mild oversteering.

  • avatar
    modemjunki

    “Today I can go down to the local Whatever car dealership and buy any number of 25G family sedans that will do the quarter mile in 15 seconds or less, top out at over 130mph, pull over .80g will ease, and brake from 70mph in less than 180ft.”

    You can probably find a used SVT Contour for pennies on the dollar now and drive the wheels off it. I regret selling mine off – it was inexpensive (second hand), comfortable, and easy enough to turn a wrench on (a Ford, after all..).

    But the Porsche is the stratosphere for a working stiff like me, a car to lust after, knowing it’s just a dream. I should take the little Focus SVT for a spin, it’s been a while..

  • avatar
    vento97

    “Today I can go down to the local Whatever car dealership and buy any number of 25G family sedans that will do the quarter mile in 15 seconds or less, top out at over 130mph, pull over .80g will ease, and brake from 70mph in less than 180ft.”

    Yeah, but that family sedan won’t get you the blonde and it’s not a Porsche. The End…

  • avatar
    adrift

    Engineering magic has dialed out much of the rear-weight bias wickedness. 911s are pretty safe these days, unless you drive over the edge. Plus, if you want true handling nirvana, choose a mid-engined variant instead of a 911.

    As for cost, older Porsches are VERY inexpensive. Boxsters sold so many copies as to be downright cheap used. And 911s with any age on them quickly get cheaper and cheaper. 944s are practically given away, etc. Try less than $5k.

    In other words, before you dismiss Porsches, make sure you do enough research to really know the story, and that doesn’t mean hanging out on a few non-Porsche bulletin boards. Go shopping, test drive a few (esp on curvy roads), hang out with some Porsche people, and then decide. They might still not be for you (different strokes, after all), but until you really research it, you definitely won’t know what all the hoopla is about. Porsche couldn’t possibly be bribing ALL the automotive journalists and ALL the track junkies who will accept nothing else. There has to be something there.

  • avatar
    Luther

    After riding in one of these, I can can comfirm that Christian Doppler was correct..er..Maybe it was the blood flow in my eyeballs.

    What is more impressive than 0-60 is 185-80…I discovered the “brown” shift from that. (A6 – Germany)

  • avatar
    narkleptic

    Nice review,even better car. I may be in the minority here, but I might cut back a little on the alliteration. A little goes a long way.
    Less is usually more.

  • avatar
    TwingoV12

    Hmm, I live in a big German city and I frequently see 911´s of all sorts and ages, many 996´s and 997´s, including this new turbo….

    …. I don´t know why, but I find them boring. Perhaps *because* I see them so very often and frequently.

    One thing I find rally lame – and I believe it´s already been mentioned above – is that Porsche can´t seem to come up with a truly new, stunning, original design. Every new 911 is just a blueprint of the previous one, with some minor changes, but retaining the same old shape from what… 1964…. ??!?

    With the 997, Porsche Photoshop artists… err designers have apparently decided to simply copy the 964 in terms of bodywork details and interior design details. At least the interior doesn´t look as terribly cheap anymore as the 996 interior, which even made an old Hyundai´s interior look like some stunning piece of high-class interior design.

    WRT this car being so pricey, I don´t know what it´s like in he U.S., but at least in countries like Germany, these cars aren´t actually purchased. They get leased by corporations, and the lease cost is tax deductible to a cetain degree.

    My guess is that in Germany, at least 80% of all poeple driving around in Porsches and other expensive vehicles are not the owners of the respective cars in a legal sense.

    Greetings…. :)

  • avatar
    stuki

    “WRT this car being so pricey, I don´t know what it´s like in he U.S., but at least in countries like Germany, these cars aren´t actually purchased. They get leased by corporations, and the lease cost is tax deductible to a cetain degree.”

    Leave it to the social democrats to dream up corporate tax deductions for 911 turbos. Wonder if Hillary will take that lead.

  • avatar
    Stephan Wilkinson

    You are somehow under the impression that such tax deductions don’t already exist in the U. S.?????? Is there anything people _won’t_ find a way to blame on “Hillary”?

  • avatar
    CoffeeJones

    Porsche’s base price and what most buyers actually pay are two different things.
    There is always a large amount of customization options for every car Porsche makes, especially for the 911.
    And they charge for every little thing; porsche badge on the wheels, model designation on the back, etc.

    theflyersfan: “stripped down pure track car”
    That’s kind of what the GT3-RS is. Still road legal.

  • avatar
    adrift

    @stuki

    Is this logic something similar to the Chewbacca Defense? Sheesh, it makes my head hurt.

    Leave it to the truly rabid to find a way to accuse the other party of its own party’s failings.

    Okay, no more on this off topic from me.

  • avatar
    maxspivak

    Porsche 911 Turbo — my ultimate halo car. Drool…

  • avatar
    Seth

    I think 50 years from now, people will look back and wonder what happened to these dino juice sucking porsches… Imagine a hydrogen porsche.. We are at the pinnacle of automotive art people. enjoy while you can! ’cause a hydrogen/electric porsche doesnt sound very exciting atleast to me!

  • avatar
    MR42HH

    @Megan
    Most DSG autos beat manuals because they can shift faster than any human can. Granted, I don’t know the specifics of the auto tranny in the Turbo, but I do know that certain ones can best manual shifting.

    The autobox in the Turbo is the standard Mercedes 5-speed, and while it’s faster from 0-60, i’ve read that it makes the Turbo even more of a GT and less of an actual sportscar, because it’s tuned for comfort.

  • avatar
    ktm

    I spent 4 years in Germany while in highschool and my father owned a 1972 911T. I abolutely LOVED that car then and still look back on it with fondness now.

    I have owned and driven a number of modern performance vehicles: E46 325i, B5 S4, 350z, WRX, G35. I also own a 1972 Datsun 240z. Out of all the cars I have driven, I still prefer my father’s old 1972 911T. There is just ‘something’ about a Porsche that is hard to articulate, but it makes you want one and never leave the driver seat.

  • avatar
    stuki

    Guys, sorry if I stepped across some unstated no politics boundary…. And I definitely didn’t mean to ‘blame’ German tax law on Hillary. Heck, if she promised tax policies like that over here, maybe she’d even have some voters in the ‘NASCAR states’. The only automotive tax breaks we seem to get out of the current administration, is on overgrown and under engineered tractors, with gross weight, handling and overall dynamic sophistication hardly distinguishable from that of a Greyhound bus.

  • avatar
    AGR

    whatdoiknow1, you make prescient comments. We are collectively in the age of “power”, if these cars would not have all the electronic nannies that they have, manufacturers would not sell cars with those levels of power for fear of being sued.

    Its a “mental state” rarely can the owner of these cars “get on it” and stay “on it”. The performance envelope is beyond what the environment can tolerate.

    For the fleeting moment when everything in the rearview mirror shrinks, its quite the experience.

  • avatar
    NICKNICK

    TreyV:
    Either you did, or you didn’t. I don’t think you can pee yourself “a little bit.” :)

  • avatar
    ronbo456

    @stuki: Maybe it’s just me, but isn’t it more of a hassle to properly track prep the road car you arrived in, and then after the session is over, road prep it again, than it would be to simply keep a separate, more focused car, either at the track, or on a trailer?

    Actually, a lot of people see it that way. I have a 1986 Porsche 944 as a track and race car. If I wad it up I’ll just fix or replace it. If I stuffed a Turbo I’d be in deep sh!t (read your insurance policy).

    I’d love to drive the Turbo at least once, but I wouldn’t own one for the street. There just aren’t any roads in the Northeast where it’s safe to open it up. I’m looking at a 964 right now, about 250 hp on about 2300#. That’s plenty of power-to-weight and it won’t cost a fortune to buy, maintain or fix.

    @carguy: Ferraris, Lambos and Ford GTs are a pain to live with and do more to announce your self esteem deficiency issues than provide daily driving enjoyment.

    Actually I find my Ferrari (’98 456) very easy to live with. It’s quite reliable – really! – and an absolute blast to drive. I bought it after the first two owners had taken most of the depreciation hit so it hasn’t been a painful experience at all.

    Maintenance is costly relative to a Porsche, largely because there are twice as many cylinders, and parts are insanely expensive, but otherwise it’s a real pleasure. My buddy has a Ford GT which, he says, is like a Ford when it comes to repair and maintenance. Lambos are Audis on steroids – probably more reliable than a Porsche.

    And for the record I’m pretty sure I don’t have pee-pee issues. If you think otherwise I’d like to know how you know (and why you have been checking out my pee-pee).

  • avatar
    BEAT

    Too bad they don’t built the 944 anymore that model was really my type. The 944 was extraordinary. I still see them on the road around New England and a lot of them.

    I don’t like the new Cabriolet it’s like the old one and never really change over the years.
    Yap they added some tarmac and little body curve but still the same for me.

    The bad part of this 911 it sounded like a Volkswagen, the old and new models.
    Did you notice that?

  • avatar
    wludavid

    @narkleptic
    I may be in the minority here, but I might cut back a little on the alliteration. A little goes a long way. Less is usually more.
    You may be in the minority, but you’re not alone. I got to “haptic harridans Teutonic titillation” and decided to count instances. I found 12 (in 11 paragraphs) and that was leaving out common alliterative phrases like “sport seats.”

    You write well, Matthew! Stop trying to be so cute with it.

  • avatar
    whatdoiknow1

    Horsepower is cheap! That is why we see so much of it today in just about every thing from mini-vans to mopeds. I am sick and tied of manufactures using HP as a selling point when everything else about their cars is getting cheaper and of lower quality. Today if we want more power we simply adjust the ECU!

    I would gladly trade away 20 to 50 hp from most cars on the market today if I could get the better interior and exterior quality that we used to see in such cars like MB, BMW and Porsche.

    Unfortunately as long a stupid consumers are willing to go gaga over silly HP figures that they can never and will never make use of Automakers will continue to sell a bunch of hype over substance.

    When I read a lot of these post I get the impression that many of us writing here are full of BS! I doubt most folks here have actually seen a sustained 130 mph let alone 150 mph! In all honesty this 911 Turbo is as quick and fast as an F1 race car and how many of us can really drive one of those, well?

  • avatar
    adrift

    @whatdoiknow1

    If you think a 911 turbo is as fast/quick as an F1 car, then the question posed by your your user name is answered. lol

    911 interiors have never been anything to write home about. They have always been very spartan. Only recently have they even tried for a more luxurious look. I am not sure what by-gone 911 luxury interior you are missing.

  • avatar
    whatdoiknow1

    adrift:
    Please answer me, how fast is an F1 car to 60 and 100mph? Before you do so please tell how it is tuned; for qualifing or racing?
    Trust me I know an F1 car can be tuned with as much as a 200 to 300hp difference. I have seen tests of both F1 and Cart racers tuned to produce anywhere from 700 to over 900 hp and they somehow never hit 60 below 3 seconds. Yes, I know the as the speed increases the F1 will leave a 911 turbo in the dust, but what happens if I now tune the 911 Turbo to make say 650hp? I hope you get my point. This car is superfast with really no were to go.

    The problem with the interior of the 911 Turbo is that it is a $120,000 car that I need to spend an additional 20 grand to get the interior to look like a $120,000 car. But I was refering to all cars in general not just the porsche with my comments. But if you want to concentrate on the Porsche, look closely and you will see many cheapo low cost parts. Tell me what is the point of an expensive status toy that has funtional and style ques that look and feel cheap?

    Maybe I am strange but if I am spending that much I dont want to see were the manufacture decided to save some coins. If you are charging that much there should be no need for cost-cutting.

  • avatar
    jstnspin82

    Porsche proves to everyone year after year, generation after generation, that the 911 Turbo is the best sports car model. Every generation, they make it quicker, handle better, and the performance is nothing less then perfect. The 2009 represents the 911 in it’s purest form and it is unmatched by none. There is a reason why it is priced so high, it is worth every penny! You get ore then you pay for! The 911 is an icon and is the best sports car of it’s day! PORCHE – THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE

  • avatar
    adrift

    I beg to differ. I would argue the GT3 represents the 911 in its purest form, while the turbo represents the 911 maximized to its fullest road-car potential. It is fast, comfortable, and easy to drive at ridiculous speeds, and quite safely at that.

    I would also argue the Cayman would be a better car than the 911, if they would just unfetter it.


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