By on March 9, 2007

jeepaction15.jpgHigh gasoline prices, foreign wars in oil producing nations and fears of global warming have made fuel efficiency the new patriotism. Yet many Americans reject clown-sized economy cars and suppository shaped CUV’s and minivans. They cling to the outdoorsy lifestyle and the go-anywhere freedom embodied by rough-and-tumble SUV’s. In a second attempt to address these shifting values, Jeep has unveiled the Patriot. It's an SUV for gas conscious Americans! Actually, never mind all that. Please, oh please, just let it be better than the Compass.

Visually, the $15k (FWD) Patriot succeeds where its mechanical doppelganger, the Compass, fails. The Patriot actually looks like a Jeep. Its grille is more upright and the hood smartly folds over the seven slots and round headlights. Beneath the bumpers, the Patriot’s body work tapers back, facilitating off road-friendly approach and departure angles.

jp007_003pa.jpgMuscular fenders frame the trademark Jeep trapezoidal wheel wells in the Grand Cherokee fashion– as opposed to the Compass’ fat Elvis fender work. The Patriot’s upright greenhouse follows the same rectangular proportions as the Commander, which itself is an homage to the Cherokee. Wrangleresque it ain’t, but the Patriot’s Mom was clearly playing in the Jeep gene pool.

Serious Jeepers aren’t picky about interior aesthetics. Dirt lovin’ Wrangler and Liberty owners have been known to strip their rigs’ interior carpeting and spray pickup truck bed liner over the bare metal. These fearless depreciators will appreciate the Patriot's interior’s Rubbermaid chic.

jp007_016pa.jpgSure it has carpeting, available leather seats, a leather wrapped steering wheel and splashes of trendy faux aluminum, but every other surface and compartment is constructed from textured molded plastic. No matter how dusty and foul the Patriot’s cabin gets plugging mud, crawling over rocks and slithering through sand, cleanliness is only a damp rag away; it’s like wiping down a baby’s high chair.

Of course, the pairing of this highly washable interior with a vehicle designed to appeal to off-road-crazed Jeep owners is strictly coincidental. Chrysler uses this same nasty cheap plastic in nearly every car they make, including the identically appointed Jeep Compass. Furthermore, the most dedicated (and filthiest) off-road enthusiasts will stick with Wranglers. The Patriot will be competing for acceptance in urban and suburban environs, where drivers expect more refinement.

On the positive side, the seating position is excellent, especially for taller drivers. Drivers trading in their gas sucking Jeep Liberty will appreciate the Patriot’s generous leg room and reclining rear seats.

jeepaction5.jpgWhen it comes to driving, the Patriot takes a back seat to its fraternal twin, the Compass, whose ride and handling are already on the wrong side of unacceptable. Although only 1.5" taller and 33lbs heavier, the Patriot is much more sensitive to all non-linear motions, thanks to its four-wheel independent suspension. The dynamics are strictly Olde Worlde; the Patriot leans and flops its way down a winding road like a wounded Hessian. 

The Compass’ excellent brakes are… AWOL. The Patriot’s stop pedal engages its four-wheel disks very slowly indeed, and resents driver input. Nonetheless, the long legged suspension eagerly dispatches bumps and gobbles up highway carbuncles, hinting at the Patriot's off-road potential.

engine.jpgUnfortunately, these sisters-under-the-skin share their most vital greasy bits: their drivetrains. Both vehicles come incomplete with an atonal 2.4-liter 16-valve four-cylinder Dual Variable Valve Timing World Engine, attached to a buzz-inducing (and not in the caffeinated sense of the word) Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT).

The 172hp mill motivates the Patriot to 60mph in… yawn… stretch… ah, who cares? You’ll get up to freeway speeds, you know, eventually. And yet this engine is Patriot’s raison d'être. In 4×2 trim, the EPA prognosticators promise 24/27mpg. It’s a [theoretically] stratospheric achievement. You know, for a Jeep.

jeepaction2.jpgEarly four-pot 4Runners, Monteros, Pathfinders and Cherokees conquered hill and dale with aplomb. Though capable in the bush, these lightweight vehicles were gutless tin cans compared to their robust descendants. Their modern incarnations now tilt the scales well in excess of two tons. By contrast, the Patriot is an SUV lightweight: 3,326lbs. in full regalia. And it’s still a pig.

For off-roader drivers, Jeep reinforced the Patriot’s underlying Mitsubishi GA platform with an ultra-high-strength steel cross-car beam above the rear axle. Optional Trail Rated models ($25k and up) get the Freedom-Drive II drive train system (utilizing the CVT at a 19:1 ratio for steep ascents and descents), downhill braking control mode, an engine oil cooler, extra ground clearance and skid plates. Packaged with the Patriot’s Jeepish looks, these features give the ute the cred that the Compass lacks.

jp007_004pa.jpgNot that Jeep cares. On the official website, under “Capabilities,” the copy talks about the Patriot’s “smooth, agile and responsive handling… on mountain switchbacks and [during] evasive maneuvers” and, I swear, “parallel parking… made easy.” If Jeep is aiming the Patriot at the CR-V, RAV4 and Escape, they’re in big trouble. With its Playmobil interior, gutless engine and questionable handling, the Patriot is far better off road than on.

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99 Comments on “Jeep Patriot Review...”


  • avatar
    graham p

    Ah, parallel parking in the wilderness. Finally somebody admit what the SUV thing is all about.

  • avatar
    UnclePete

    William, did you have a chance to off-road it at all? Old Wranglers and Cherokees were no speed demons on the road either, but we know their off-road abilites. If the Patriot is at least capable in the dirt, it gets extra props from me.

  • avatar
    William C Montgomery

    UnclePete, other than tearing around a dirt lot I did not get a chance to really go wheelin’ in the Patriot. I would love to do so and test the 19:1 CVT gear ratio in the wild.

    There is a video making the rounds on YouTube that shows the Patriot doing some pretty serious off-road driving. If I can find it I will post the link in a comment.

  • avatar
    jurisb

    patriot looks like a kmart version of commander. the point is that, patriot being launched recently ,already looks obsolete, something like having dived out straight from late 80ies. it`s typical american car- mitsubishi lancer platform. interior doesn`t have any single chromed piece, everything cries out cheap plastic. air conditioner controls remind ultraprimitive supereconomy dacia at least. even if the seat leather won`t shine like bald man`s head, still the environment reminds starvation of detailing.primitive black plastic mirrors, thick uneven door gaskets( to windows), gas cap that opens from outside. well,. the car looks recognizable, associates me with the whole primitivism paradigm that i remember from wrangler, which couldn`t push technology, so had to push all-rugged-out legend, ditto harley -davidson.( jeep was the only company for a long time that afforded such attavisms as putting leaf springs up front!) patriot is in no way to compete with rav4. the whole jeep brand exploits non existent legend, that is telling- rough, strong, durable. ( rough, because there is no quality and gaps are huge everywhere, and no money for centuries was invested to deal with those issues, strong? well if strenght is measured by hp or torque, then…, durable- because it was so primitive ,there were no virtually parts that could break down, like bolt, that doesn`t break). patriot among commander is destined for total failure. and believe me, i am not nostrodamus.the only way americans sold cars, was because the looked proportional and beautiful( or beautifully distinctive from europeans). this hasnothing- it is not american , it is not beautiful, no quality, no finish, no texture.bang for the buck? yupp. discount is like a suspicion of inability to sell crappy stuff. 

  • avatar

    After driving both the Caliber and Compass, and absolutely despising nearly everything about the latter, I haven’t yet found inclination time to check the Patriot out. But at least it looks a lot better than the Compass.

    My price comparison and reliability site’s page for the Patriot:

    http://www.truedelta.com/models/Patriot.php

    After a rocky start, reliability of the related Caliber appears to be trending towards average.

  • avatar
    Brett In San Francisco

    From your review I think this may be a good idea, but the ball dropped in its execution. Reading the first couple paragraphs, I thought that this might be something I should look at. Bigger than a Wrangler, but competent off road at that price point sounds great. I live in the city, but in California the mountains and desert are not far away (I miss camping in Ocotillo on summer nights). The thing is, I want some semblence of handling and road feel for M-F in the city. A Wrangler is just too small, and other SUV’s are either too expensive to play in the dirt or too toyish. Oh well, I haven’t bought an American car in 9 years anyway so why would I think one would be compelling now?

  • avatar
    cheezeweggie

    Well now, American-Benz (AKA Chrysler) has finally figured out that most Americans want something that looks tough but only really needs to be tough enough to make it over those nasty speed bumps at the grocery store. Although it’s a shame to see the Jeep name watered down and badge engineered.

  • avatar
    TexasAg03

    The off-road video is here:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E2stIOe9QJg

    It looks fairly capable, but I’d like to see more…

  • avatar
    rodster205

    Yes, the CVT sucks. Didn’t you forget something though? There IS a stick shift available, and from what I have read this makes it a much better driver.

  • avatar

    I test drove a CompASS and it was just a terrible car. I’m not sure how much better a Patriot would be, but if it’s better offroad, then at least it serves more of a purpose.

  • avatar

    Oh and concerning the stick shift, you can’t get it in the off road Trail Rated package.

  • avatar
    Labrat

    I like the new road test format with the star ratings as well as quick recap statements.

  • avatar
    SuperAROD

    I've read nothing but positive reviews on this vehicle. It comes available in Rubicon Trail Rated trim and I recently read an article from an Off Road mag where they took the Patriot and the new Wrangler on a monster trail in the snow, and the Patriot was able to follow the Wrangler everwhere but the absolute most extreme stuff. You CANNOT find a better SUV for the price. Period.

  • avatar
    Seth

    “Although it’s a shame to see the Jeep name watered down and badge engineered. ”

    Comments like these must have been expected by Jeep folks. They still went ahead with it. What does that tell you? Either they are very smart or very dumb. Do they know something that we dont?

  • avatar

    William,

    What was the price as tested for the Patriot you drove?

    If you are looking for performance numbers out of a Jeep, try the SRT-8, otherwise I agree with SuperAROD…

  • avatar
    NN

    By creating both the Compass and the Patriot, Jeep (in my opinion) has crushed the potential for the Patriot to succeed. I think if it was introduced on it’s own, it would have relative merit–honestly, this is a great car for the active Generation X…easy to clean interior, (cheap, sure, but easy to clean is more important in a vehicle that may actually be used for utilitarian/adventurous purposes), rugged, off-road capable, and still gets 25+ mpg. This is a very practical vehicle. Many people (not on this website, but most people in general) do not give a $&*% about 0-60 times or the fact that their interior is carved out of italian marble and the hide of an endangered minx. They look at the utility of a vehicle, and this vehicle shines in that respect. I do think this car is a nice and unique alternative to many other small cars and CUV’s.

    Unfortunately, the Compass is so disgusting that it will cast a bad aura over this vehicle. I bet the Patriot would have done better on it’s own than with the Patriot & Compass, plus, Jeep would not have bastardized themselves so much, and Chrysler could have kept some development $$ in it’s pocket.

  • avatar
    starlightmica

    Thanks to flexible production, I would figure that they can sink the Compass without a trace and replace it with their siblings. At least they didn’t spend that much R&D money to differentiate the Compass. I hope.

  • avatar
    William C Montgomery

    My test car was a loaded (navigation system, satellite radio, leather seats, etc.) 2007 Patriot Limited 4×2. Sticker price: $23,670.

  • avatar

    Brett in SF,

    Did you drive a Wrangler Unlimited?

    As for some other posters – the preponderence of Jeep bashing is sickening…not a single competititor can hold a candle to the mountain goat abilities of the Wrangler….not Rover, RAV 4, Toureg, nada…none…zilch.

    The Jeep cousins, distant as they may seem, were not designed to do all the things that Wrangler can….that would be the true definition of watering down the brand.

    How many SUV, SAV vehicles take their rides off-road, let alone through a rain puddle…let’s try comparing apples to apples.

  • avatar
    William C Montgomery

    NN:
    Yes, the Patriot has the stink of Compass on it. On the other hand, by comparison Compass helps Patriot look more appealing.

  • avatar
    hondaboy55

    So how is this CVT thing gunna do on an off road application? Is it better than a regular automatic, or is it just gunna burn itself up ?

    Is there a history on the CVT unit in this vehicle?

  • avatar
    Martin Watson

    “It comes available in Rubicon Trail Rated trim ”

    Um, no. This wouldn’t make it to the entrance of the first stage of the Rubicon Trail. DCX did away with the Rubicon Trail requirement years ago and substitued “Trail Rated” in it’s stead. In my considered opinion, the fact that a Liberty could be “Trail Rated” speaks volumes about the rating.

  • avatar
    ash78

    All this vehicle tells me is that the Compass should never have been born. It’s the Danny DeVito character in Twins.

  • avatar
    FTHorn

    I have driven a few Patriots and for $15k they are GREAT. The MINI Cooper, Versa and Patriot top my list of what to buy next. Unfortunately, my caravan looks to be perfect through 100k miles and it might be hard to part with it since I have had ZERO problems with it.

  • avatar

    Martin,
    As a Liberty owner and enthusiast, I just want you to know that it is an incredibly underrated vehicle. I have taken it on many trails, practically bone stock save for new tires, and haven’t gotten stuck on anything yet. It is quite a beast and I love the thing to death. It’s almost never without an “Alabama paintjob”(mud/dirt). The only thing I’d ever trade it for is a Wrangler Rubicon Unlimited, which will be done in the summer. I just miss driving stick.

  • avatar

    The seats might fit tall drivers but they don’t offer great support.
    I couldn’t believe how T I N Y this vehicle was when I saw it in person.
    In my opinion, the best low end “Jeep” SUV at this point is the…. Nitro

  • avatar
    James

    Here is a good video I found on youtube showing the Patriot off-roading.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gTYMFvcZQbw

    another not so bad video
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9UCEqbxAvKo#

    in-depth, real review:

    http://www.expeditionswest.com/equipment/reviews/patriot/index.htm

    These guys that do this for a living (to MAKE money) conclude:
    “Conclusion:

    The Patriot is without question the best OHV performer in it’s class
    and also has great highway performance and 30mpg economy. I am not
    suggesting that the Patriot is a replacement for a Rubicon Unlimited
    or Toyota Tacoma on the trail, or a Toyota Land Cruiser for a Round
    The World Expedition, but it will provide a great ride, value,
    economy and rugged track performance for the buyer. I would not
    hesitate to take the Patriot on the White Rim Road, or El Camino Del
    Diablo, loaded full of gear. This segment is about providing value,
    and for the first time, there is an option that also provides
    performance on the trail.”

  • avatar
    TWX

    The Patriot succeeds where all of the Car-based SUVs of the last fifteen years (Rav4, X-90, CR-V, Geo Tracker, etc) failed. It provides ACCEPTABLE on-road performance, no worse than any average, mid-line vehicle, with EXCELLENT off-road capabilities, for a very, very good price. This thing is perfect for the young family that likes to go camping off in the National Forest but can’t justify/afford/store a special-purpose vehicle for that trip and doesn’t want to pay a gas-mileage penalty for driving such a vehicle on a daily basis.

  • avatar
    cheezeweggie

    Seth, I kinda figured that myself. When I think of the Jeep psyche,I am reminded of Harley Davidson. Both companies have a hard core following and (at least until recently as far as Jeep is concerned) and a tightly targeted product line. you could almost say that HD and Jeep were more of an attitude than a product. I dont think that HD would be where thay are today if they slapped their name on anything with two wheels. They tried that in the seventies and it failed. With that in mind I hope the same thing doesnt happen to Jeep. Although I am no big fan of their SUV’s, I have great respect for the good old CJ type Jeep. I am not biased – I dont ride and I drive a Nissan Pickup.

  • avatar
    SherbornSean

    I wonder if Jeep will have trouble with this introduction. My guess is that most Compass intenders walking into the showroom will notice that with all the incentives on it, the Liberty is the same money, and a lot more Jeep.

  • avatar
    DharmaDog

    Why, oh, why did Jeep kill the Cherokee?!?!

    The Liberty is no Cherokee. I have a 1998 Cherokee that I have abused since November 1997. Coming up on 10 years and it’s still going strong, both on and off road. I’ve driven several Liberties and they just don’t compare in any measurable way. I can’t stand the way they look, either. The next gen Liberty at least solves that issue.

    Jeep must stop watering down the brand. The Compass must die, and it probably wouldn’t hurt to take the Patriot with it. That said, Jeep does need a vehicle that is capable off-road and costs less than the Liberty. That doesn’t mean it needs to suck though.

  • avatar
    Martin Schwoerer

    An accurate and entertaining review, as good as the other ones by WCM. I liked it!

  • avatar
    miked

    DharmaDog: “Jeep must stop watering down the brand.”

    So true. I could see if Jeep were its own company then to survive it would need to have a car for every puropose. But since it’s under the DCX umbrella, Jeep can afford to just focus on doing one thing and doing it right. And I think most people will agree with me that that “one thing” is off road ability and utility. I wish I could still buy a striped down CJ with no extra frills. But since I can’t I’m out this weekend looking at buying a ’76 CJ-5.

  • avatar
    ejacobs

    What a good idea! I think this Jeep will be a great addition to the model lineup. It’s utility, practicality, small size, and good off-road ability sort of put it in a class by itself. What else can do all that stuff and still get good gas mileage? The only thing is, I bet real-world fuel economy won’t be that great, especially if you have to flog that dull motor all the time…Oh, and kill the Compass for God’s sake. If I were a Jeep enthusiast I would be sick to my stomach until it dies, then have a jamboree (isn’t that what Jeep folks call a party?)

  • avatar
    SuperAROD

    http://www.expeditionswest.com/equipment/reviews/patriot/index.htm

  • avatar
    bfg9k

    [i]# TWX:
    March 9th, 2007 at 1:20 pm

    The Patriot succeeds where all of the Car-based SUVs of the last fifteen years (Rav4, X-90, CR-V, Geo Tracker, etc) failed. It provides ACCEPTABLE on-road performance, no worse than any average, mid-line vehicle, with EXCELLENT off-road capabilities, for a very, very good price. This thing is perfect for the young family that likes to go camping off in the National Forest but can’t justify/afford/store a special-purpose vehicle for that trip and doesn’t want to pay a gas-mileage penalty for driving such a vehicle on a daily basis.
    [/i]

    Of course, they could always rent a vehicle for those camping trips…

  • avatar
    Chris D.

    As a former Colorado 4×4 junkie, in my younger days I did everything from mild (don’t spill my latte) to insane in my old CJ-5. The only thing that could stop my Jeep was, sadly, itself. It was built by AMC, and in the course of my stewardship it required a new engine, tranny, steering gear, and radiator.

    I watched the DCX promotional video on YouTube, and I’m not overwhelmed. It looks rugged to those who have never really off-roaded, but I’ve done more serious off-roading in my wife’s ’02 CR-V and I think I even have the photos to prove it, somewhere.

    It’s amazing where you can go with a little ground clearance, when combined with careful clutch/throttle action and a healthy dose of common sense. During my wildest CJ-5 jaunts, I often met ’80s Subaru wagons and even VW buses carefully picking their way over amazingly rugged mining and loggin trails.

  • avatar
    P.J. McCombs

    I like the Patriot. It’s got the trendy jerrycan looks that compel couch potatoes to drive Hummers, while undercutting the CR-V and RAV4 by thousands. It’ll put the Compass out of our misery in no time.

    I, too, lament the dilution of the Jeep brand with products like this. But let’s be realistic: it’s nothing compared to the dilution of Jeep *drivers*, and SUV owners in general. Off-roaders just don’t contribute to Jeep’s bottom line enough to drive DCX’s product decisions. Same reason Mitsubishi dropped turbos and AWD from the Eclipse line.

    Speaking of Mitsus, I love that the road-noise-prone Compass/Patriot/Caliber platform is dubbed GA (“gaa” being a tire engineer’s term for unwanted coarse-surface thrum).

  • avatar
    Scottie

    Those Videos are great, THey show that the Patriot is about as good as a FWD car off-road. They are going fast over the hills to let the momentum carry them over, Its not Traction or Suspension flex that getting that car through those obstacles. If driven like that off-road you would end up with a great deal of damage.

  • avatar
    Scottie

    “# TWX:
    March 9th, 2007 at 1:20 pm

    The Patriot succeeds where all of the Car-based SUVs of the last fifteen years (Rav4, X-90, CR-V, Geo Tracker, etc) failed. It provides ACCEPTABLE on-road performance, no worse than any average, mid-line vehicle, with EXCELLENT off-road capabilities, for a very, very good price.”

    You aren’t familar with Suzuki’s and off-road performance are you?

  • avatar
    CarShark

    I don’t think people are familiar with Suzuki, period. That’s half their problem!

  • avatar
    dean

    The Suzuki Sidekick (aka Tracker and several other badge engineered clones) has a huge cult following in the off-road world. They are damn capable vehicles with a lift kit and the right tires.

    In TWX’s defense, however, he spoke of “acceptable” on-road performance and that is something to which you could only credit the Suzuki if you were in a particularly generous mood. (I should know, I’ve owned a fully-optioned Sidekick for 11 years).

  • avatar
    Scottie

    well i own a Samurai, and well, a Tracker is a like riding on a cloud

  • avatar
    balance

    The Compass “Limited” I drove through 2 weeks of winter was very impressive! Even with only FWD and 18″(!)wheels it confidently handled ice/snow conditions – hills and braking were no problem.

    I can appreciate some of the negative comments regarding exterior styling but like many other vehicles it grows on you and actually looks good from the rear. Really good if it’s black.

    From a value standpoint this vehicle compares favourably to anything … heated seats, ESP, spacious, comfortable, and contrary to what people who have never been in one say; a quality interior … for under 20k.

    As both Patriot and Compass are sold globally and offer diesel and RHD in other markets Jeep should have no problem finding enough intelligent consumers to warrant keeping both models.

  • avatar
    P.J. McCombs

    The Compass does represent a lot of metal and equipment for the money, but–and excuse me if I sound indelicate–the only way someone could think it has a “quality” interior is if they hadn’t set foot in any current like-priced vehicle.

    In all honesty, go check out the interiors of the lowliest bottom-feeders on the market–the Chevrolet Aveo, Nissan Versa, Toyota Yaris, et cetera… they all have thicker, more substantial-feeling dash plastics and more padded touch points. Even late-’90s Kias exhibit nothing as blatant as the sharp mold flashing inside the lip of the Compass’ passenger-side dash cubby.

  • avatar
    moto

    You lost me when you wrote, “Visually, the $15k (FWD) Patriot succeeds…”

    You’d think 50 years after the real WW2 Willys GP, Jeep would have come up with something better.

    Cheap, crude little boxes with an antiquated look don’t impress me much. If this is Chrysler’s answer to the fuel economy challenge, it’ll be good that they collapse under their own ineptitude.

  • avatar
    shaker

    I remember seeing a sticker on the engine-side of the hood on an early Suzuki Samarai (I paraphrase) “For off-road use only, vehicle life 50,000 miles”. I thought it was weird for a carmaker to admit such a thing; I can only assume that it was Gov’t mandated…
    I’m amazed that Jeep (DCX) is upstaging its own Compass with the Patriot (I’d say that the Patriot would appeal more to the “Jeep” cult). Seems counterproductive (schizo) to me.

  • avatar

    I know they are appealing to a market I’ll never understand, but a fwd SUV is, well, useless. Good luck selling that thing as a used vehicle anywhere in the snow belt.

    Why can’t people who buy junk like this just admit they really want a car? Plenty of nice cars over at the Subaru dealer…

  • avatar
    tankd0g

    Why would anyone even bother THINKING about getting the trail rated package on one of these things when they could have twice the vehicle in the Toyota FJ Cruiser for less money??

  • avatar
    Martin Albright

    Tankdog: I don’t know what the prices are where you live but in Colorado you can’t touch an FJ for under $28k. And most of them are optioned out to the $30k+ range.

  • avatar
    boredlawstudent

    With rebates, a 2007 Liberty Sport 4WD can be had for under $20K. Fuel economy aside, comparing these two vehicles, which would be the better deal?

  • avatar
    tankd0g

    Base FJ Cruiser (which includes 239hp v6, diff lock, traction control, skid plates, hill decent, 6 speed, 2 speed transfer case..the list goes on) $29,900 Canadian

  • avatar

    Well hey, at least they’re getting rid of the Jeep Commander. At some point, the price of gas will indeed dictate vehicle choice. Who really needs an SUV other than someone who goes off-road, at least once in a while?

  • avatar
    wsn

    Reply tankd0g:

    Base FJ Cruiser (which includes 239hp v6, diff lock, traction control, skid plates, hill decent, 6 speed, 2 speed transfer case..the list goes on) $29,900 Canadian

    Yeah, as a Canadian, I hate it when the Canadian dollar doesn’t offer much purchasing power. Officially, 1 USD = 1.2 CND; but with cars it’s between 1.3 CND (for low end cars) and 1.8 CND (for high end ones).

    The FJ has a starting MSRP of US$22,110. Even if the actual OTD price could be much higher, the overall cost is lower when you consider about resale.

  • avatar
    Rifter

    Now if Subaru can put Patriot’s body on Forester XT’s drivetrain, it would be best small ute in the market.

  • avatar
    rheath2

    moto:

    Jeep looks that way because…well…it’s a Jeep. They’ve done one of the best jobs for establishing visual recognition in nearly any type of category. Changing the design of Jeep (i.e. Compass) is like changing the formula of Coca Cola (i.e. New Coke), there are some things that just don’t need to be changed.

  • avatar
    Mike McDonals

    “Why would anyone even bother THINKING about getting the trail rated package on one of these things when they could have twice the vehicle in the Toyota FJ Cruiser for less money??”

    tankd0g, if by “twice the vehicle” you mean “twice the ugly” then I would agree. Why didn’t they just paint all of the windows black? As mentioned you pay a lot more for ugly, the Patriot is a lot less money and is not hard on the eyes.

  • avatar
    tankd0g

    Alright one more time folks, trail rated Patiot. $25k, vastly better equiped (for off roading) FJ, $23k US. Fuel milage is irrelevant because anyone who actually does off road knows that single digit milage is all you’re going to get no matter what truck you bring. However if you wanted to get the Patiot’s claimed milage, all you would have to do is short shift the Toyota’s 4.0L motor and oyu would still get to 60 faster than the Jeep. And if you want to get in an argument about who did a better job of re-creating the style of an automotive icon, you’ve obvously never seen an FJ40.

  • avatar
    rheath2

    tankd0g, I’ll agree the old Toyota FJs were absolutely amazing and are still to this day one of my favorite trucks. And I applaud Toyota for making a unique looking vehicle instead of the normal electric-shaver fare. However, I think comparison of it’s intended market is more along the lines of the Wrangler, as it was in the older days.

    If you really want to compare the FJ40, compare it to a 2007 Wrangler Unlimited X for more similarity. $24k for the FJ and $22k for the Wrangler. Both offer 4 doors, six speed manuals, power door locks, a/c, and have their traditions in true four wheeling.

  • avatar
    Mike McDonals

    “Fuel milage is irrelevant because anyone who actually does off road knows that single digit milage is all you’re going to get no matter what truck you bring…”

    Fuel mileage WOULD be a consideration for the majority of buyers, MOST of the miles on vehicles like these will be spent ON ROAD.

  • avatar
    Martin Albright

    Again, I would ask if anybody in the real world has been able to approach a 4wd FJ for under $25k. Here in Colorado the FJ is so hot that if you walked into a Toyota dealer with $25,000 in cash and asked for a new FJ they’d just laugh at you. Those rigs are $28k+ and they sell every one they get.

    You might be able to get a 2wd FJ (yes, they do make a 2wd model) for $24k, but I doubt that you could get a 4wd model for that price, and especially not one with the TRD package.

  • avatar
    Martin Albright

    Follow-up to the above: Just did a quick AutoTrader search. Couldn’t find a used FJ in the Denver area for under 30k.

  • avatar
    Steve Biro

    All I can say is for 25K, the Trail Rated version of the Patriot (particularly with the mandatory CVT) simply isn’t competitive. If discounts and incentives bring that down to 20K, one can probably make a case for it. Just keep in mind that, if you really plan to do serious four-wheeling and don’t need to carry lots of stuff, base Wranglers can be had in the same price range.

    However, for 15K, a front-wheel drive version of the Patriot with a manual transmission might be a compelling proposition – particularly if you plan to stay on pavement or hard-packed dirt roads. And I’m willing to bet going with better aftermarket shocks and/or struts (not to mention tires) would solve a good part of the on-road handling shortfalls William described above. I mean, think about it: We’re talking B-segment prices here.

    As for the interior, I won’t argue with anyone who hates it. But I think it’s a matter of personal taste. Yes, it’s basic, alright. But I’ve sat in the Patriot and the Dodge Caliber- and really didn’t mind it – if the purchase price stays in the 15K zone.

    I really wish there was a two-door version. I loved the look of those old two-door Cherokees – classic and timeless, like the CJ/Wrangler. But in a world where a four-door Wrangler looks to be a sales hit, I think we can rule out a two-door Patriot. Americans love their four doors.

    It seems to me that the Patriot is basically a good vehicle with some flaws that can probably be easily addressed by DCX if enough people demand that they do so. If one doesn’t forget the initial price-point and excercises restraint with the options sheet, the Patriot is a reasonable piece.

  • avatar
    tankd0g

    Ok I see we must have a bit of a regional difference here since there are two base models FJs on the lot down the street right now, and with Toyota Access Price(fix)ing, the price on the web site is the price you pay. Anyway, I was just trying to make the point that it’s a huge waste of money to tart up these pretend-utes for off road use when better alternatives are readily available.

  • avatar
    William C Montgomery

    I apologize for not responding earlier to the comments above. A few hours after my article posted I loaded our Jeep and took my kids camping for the weekend.

    Some readers have passionately insisted that if I had driven the Patriot off-road that I would have liked it more. First off, I gave 3 stars (could be worse) and noted that it is likely much better off-road than on. Secondly, just because it can leap tall boulders in a single bound off-road does not improve the interior, eliminate excessive pitch and lean, improve acceleration, or help encourage the brakes.

    I obtained a copy of the marketing materials that Jeep provides to dealership salesmen. It explicitly states that they are targeting Escape, RAV4 and CRV – each road machines with only a token nod toward off-road capability. In this arena, the Patriot does not fare well.

    Target buyers are up and coming parents without much money who are not “ready to settle down and become part of the minivan set.” The document repeatedly promotes the importance of intangibles such as “tradition and heritage of the Jeep brand” and “a vehicle [prospective buyers] want to be seen in.” This is not about hardcore off-road driving; it’s about image.

    It doesn’t matter if the Trail Rated version of the Patriot is priced competitively because it only exists to sell image conscious pavement lubbers the $15K-20K 4×2 models.

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    I must admit that I don’t give much of a damn about 0-60 times, myself.

    If I did, I wouldn’t have my 18 second Mercedes, would I?

    It occurs to me that people looking at a 4 cylinder Patriot aren’t focused on that either.

    It’s like complaining that a 911 has no cargo space, or that an F-350 doesn’t turn like a go-kart – it completely misses the point.

    (I don’t know what the point of the Patriot really is, but it sure ain’t a fast 0-60 time.)

  • avatar
    CarShark

    That’s true, Sigivald, but I think that if we were talking about the Wrangler, few would argue. It’s a purpose-built off-road car, dual solid axles and all. However, the Patriot is supposed to be more livable on-road, and I think that a decent 0-60 time and handling isn’t too much to ask, even of a Jeep.

  • avatar
    Aardappel

    “These fearless depreciators will appreciate the Patriot’s interior’s Rubbermaid chic.”

    That’s gotta be the best line yet here on TTAC. Just the visuals that come up in my mind for someone being called a depreciator had me laughing out loud.

  • avatar
    afmsquid

    This Patriot is just another wannabe Jeep. Look underneath and see the IRS, IFS, and you’ll know that this is just another car with skid plates. Trail Rated, please. Another marketing ploy by DCX.

  • avatar
    willbodine

    Although I come from a Jeep family (Dad had 2 Grand Wagoneers, brother and sis several Grand Cherokees) they do little for me. I did enjoy a Rubicon ride in a friend’s Wrangler, but again, it’s just not me. I understand Hummer has kicked Jeep’s butt in the big ute sector, but this explosion of new smaller Jeeps has this petrolhead confused. Which one is which? Don’t you start competing with yourself in this endless niche-hunting?

  • avatar
    1miracle2

    I just purchased my first Jeep and it is a Patriot. The outside looks are awesome! It’s not a trail rated w/Freedom Drive 2 but it is a 4×4 sport, which I believe has the Freedom Drive 1.
    The inside is kind of cheap looking but I’ve seen the inside of wranglers and they’re the same cr@p.

    The vehicle handles well, not that I have any prior ownership of an SUV to compare it to. But I have driven other SUV’s.

    I took it out to this area in Scottsdale AZ, across the street from Discount Tire Corp. office where there is nothing but desert for dirt bikes and some off-roading, I would say the same type as in the picture above and the Jeep handled pretty well!
    However I almost did get stuck 2 times, I was able to get out because the truck had the power. Dirt was real sandy but I went through it on purpose, the stock tires s#ck big time!

    The picture above depicts exactly what the Jeep did each time. What you ask? Spend lots of time on 3 wheels! I did notice on one side that the suspension was almost bottomed out during this time but the tires did not rub against the wheel well. (not sure if that makes sense?) In other words suspension did very well.
    I had a buddy take pic’s.

    I am upset though that It didn’t come w/any towing hooks and the current front bumper wont allow one to be installed like the ones the freedom drive 2 comes with. Grrr!!!

    gas is way better than on my former NISMO extended cab 4×2 v6. I was wasting a couple bucks shy of $60/week!
    Now I’m doing just shy of $35 or so on the JEEP!!! NICE!!!

    Insurance also dropped!!!

    All in all I love the freak’n Jeep though! I think Chrysler did very sh!tty by not letting those tow options available to put in just like the freedom drive 2.

  • avatar
    gtsmith

    “If Jeep is aiming the Patriot at the CR-V, RAV4 and Escape, they’re in big trouble”

    William, how can the Jeep be in big trouble when their product is at least $5,000 less than the CR-V, RAV, and ESCAPE. It seems to me like the Jeep represents good value and that William’s a negative bias against jeep.

  • avatar
    bruce demski

    I purchased a new Patroit and think that it is Great, and I will buy anything that is Made In U.S.A. I will not buy S**T from anywhere else.
    Drive your non profit Asian car over a bridge and you will not be missed.(at least by any true American)

  • avatar
    elaineen@aol.com

    I have 2500+ miles on my Jeep Patriot 4×4, trail rated with the Freedom II package. I also own an HHR which is comparable to the Cr-V, RAVA4 and Escape for city roads. All these vehicles would be shredded if they chased my Patriot through washboard dirt roads. Do not mix apples and oranges. The trail rated Patriot is for mild off roading and rugged dirt roads. The only vehicle that can match or exceed it was the previously mentioned Toyota F-J which locally sells for $10,000 more and lacks the fuel efficency. Only drawback is the tiny 13.5 gallon gas tank. Mileage so far is appox. 25 mpg.

  • avatar
    RETAHIGGINS

    I have been thinking about purchasing a patriot, but hesitant, because I need one with a tow package. Does anyone have any information about the towing capabilities of the Patriot?

  • avatar
    elaineen@aol.com

    The owner’s manual has ten pages of info. on towing. Most of which I do not understand since I do not plan to tow anything. With the 2.4L engine with automatic the max. towing capacity is 2000lbs.

  • avatar
    caramor

    Okay, I own a Patriot, and I love driving it! At first, I needed to get use to the transmission but it works great after you adjust to it. I get good gas mileage even though we live in the mountains. I have taken it on the freeway several times and it works fine. I do not know what these guys are complaining about? The back seat is very comfortable for adults to sit in and usually surprises people when they get in it. It does not have any of the fancy gadgets that you see in some cars today but who needs it and they are available as options if you can’t find the movie theatre yourself! I have not had an opportunity to take it out on back roads but a lot of the roads I take are dirt and rock roads and it has been great!

  • avatar
    jjan158

    I LOVE my Partriot. With highway speeds averaging 60 MPH in the USA, and most people driving 55 in teh fast lane, my Patriot has ample power to take me from point A to point B. I am an owner of 6, count them 6, vintage muscle cars with engines in the 500hp area. They aren't worth a hil of beans as 'The Man" is watching for me to open them up. So who cares it a vehicle can go 0-60 in 5.5 seconds, it isn't worth the money to feed gasoline to something that can The Patroit is a fun little vehicle that brings a smile to my face everytime I get in it Your's Truly. Jim Jankowski

  • avatar
    bplankton

    I own a Jeep Patriot and I disagree with the review. I think it is a good car for a good price, with an awesome warranty. It’s really comfortable for a tall person like myself and it gets decent gas mileage. All that talk about not competing with the CRVs and RAV-4′s is nonsense. Those cars don’t provide good room for the driver, cost a lot more, and don’t necessarily excel in providing good gas mileage. I have the Freedom 1 drive, which is adequate for snow, etc. This car’s definitely worth a look.

  • avatar
    lancekoz

    I bought this in urban Mexico to deal with lots of potholes and occasional rough roads in the country. After a thousand kms, it seems like an incredible deal. The CVT transmission and handling is perfect for in-town driving. Middling power seems fine. Suspension great on the poor roads. The front seats are extremely comfortable, but the interior has some thoughtless touches, most notable is the lack of armrest padding! The slick and fairly small back area is a drawback.

  • avatar
    keithid

    I have a question about the Freedom 2 package. I live in the mountains, so driving in snow and durability for washboard roads are my big issues. I prefer a stick for snow, but Patriot doesn’t come with the Freedom 2 package in stick. Should I care for my purposes (no rock crawling)? Would the CRV actually be better than stick? Thanks!

  • avatar
    jefty_jeff

    keithid,
    instead of the CRV perhaps you should consider a Subaru Forester/Outback or a Suzuki Grand Vitara. Both come with 5-speed, have good ground clearance and 4WD, and have much nicer and pleasant interiors and overall build quality. Look for a used one if a new one is too expensive.

    I agree that the Patriot’s not having a manual transmission in the off-road package is a let-down. They could have made it a 6-speed with one extra-low first gear to get the same crawl ratio.
    19:1 is only 35% lower than the typical 14:1 1st gear ratios. Would it really have been that hard to make a low 1st gear, and start the car in 2nd most of the time? People would have loved it a lot more than the CVT, and it would have been cheaper and more reliable too!
    The Grand Vitara even with an actual 2:1 transfer case, a locking diff, and is cheaper than the Forester.

  • avatar
    jepstr67

    As the reviewer says, hard core Jeep people are going to drive Wranglers, or in my case a Willys and a CJ. However I’m adding the Patriot to my stable of Jeeps because of it’s better mileage for on road driving. Jeep has a history of providing vehicles to meet a variety of needs. Most vehicles are offered in both 2 and 4 wheel drive. As for the Compass, it is nice to see Jeep return to the car market for the first time in 55 years. It makes a person wonder how the 1948 Jeepster would have done if it could have offered full time all wheel drive.

  • avatar
    jbauman

    I bought one of these things about a week ago and I dig it…Went from a Saab to this and the first thing I did when I got home was fold the back seats down toss in a blanket and let the dogs own the back…It’s price point and hard plastic everywhere interior allows one to not cringe with every drop of drool or claw on the arm rest…Clean up is a snap and with the wheel package I think it looks pretty slick and gas mileage is very good for vehicles in this category…I did order a 5spd without even driving it…I did drive the CVT and it sucks…I’m very happy with this vehicle and find it quite fun to drive…I can finally take the dogs out with me without having them killin’ each other in the back seat of my Saab…This is my first American car….ever…I’m 35…

  • avatar
    lancekoz

    Great handling in an inexpensive, rugged vehicle

    Pros:Perfect mini-suv handling, good steering assist, great for mild rough stuff
    Cons:A bit small in back compartment, interior issues

    I bought this in urban Mexico to deal with lots of potholes and occasional rough roads in the country. I was not in need of a “real Jeep,” so I won’t be whining about “off-road cred.”

    After 5000 kms, it seems like an incredible deal. The CVT transmission and handling is smooth and comfortable for crowded, in-town driving. Manual override is great on the big hills, and use it if the CVT bothers you. Middling power seems fine. Suspension provides good balance on rough roads. The front seats are very comfortable, but the interior has some thoughtless touches, most notable is the lack of armrest padding. The slick and fairly small back area is a drawback.

  • avatar
    bearbs119

    Hi, my husband and I just purchased our 2007 Jeep Patriot in March. We really like it. The only thing we aren’t crazy about is the torque (kinda slow starting) but otherwise the gas mileage is great (300 miles from full to empty) and my insurance dropped $100. Granted, I paid a bit more than the MSRP because of the negative equity on our trade in, but I feel like it was worth it in the long run. In no shape or form do i regret buying this vehicle.

  • avatar
    Bearwrestler

    I own the good ol’ Jeep Cherokee with the 4.0L. I get a consistent 20mpg over years of service. I have 215,000 miles on her and am looking for a replacement to try and save what I have left of her for as long as possible. I have built 4 other classic Jeeps and own 2 of them currently. I AM a Jeep man.

    Reading what I have, I will not be buying a new Jeep until the good people of DaimlerChrysler (or whatever holding company owns the market share currently) gets their heads out of their butts.

    I have heard that in 2000′s, when the Germans acquired Chrysler, they acquired it because of Jeep’s renown name (and sales market). They have defeated us by sending them down the tubes.

    My next vehicle would have been the 4 door Wrangler, but their fuel economy is below standard average. I now look to Subaru for a quality vehicle.

  • avatar
    RETAHIGGINS

    Thank you all for your responce to my question about the new Jeep Patriots. I too use to be a Jeep person. I finally went to test drive the Patriot. It isn’t a short person vehicle. It was a very uncomfortable drive. For me to reach the pedals the steering wheel was in my chest, plus you sit lower than the Cherokee classic, which means you feel the road more. I like sitting up high so I can see what’s coming at me. I decided I would go with a Mercury Mountaineer. Wow – the differences were emence. A smother drive – more comfort everything I wanted and more. I could see everything.
    Looks like I may no longer be a Jeep person.
    Bye ya’ll.

  • avatar
    VA-REBEL

    I purchased a Jeep Patriot July 27, 08 but before I did I test drove HYUNDAI SANTA FE, CHEVY EQUINOX, FORD ESCAPE, TOYOTA 4RUNNER AND FJ, MERCURY MARINER, MAZDA TRIBUTE and of course the Jeep Patriot. Jeep Patriot was fun and easy to drive and the seats are comfortable. Of all I test drove the Jeep Patriot was best of the bunch. When I bought it home and my wife drove it, she wanted me to buy her one, that’s how good it is.

  • avatar
    jefty_jeff

    How come there aren’t any tow hooks on the regular Patriot?
    I’ve crawled around a North edition and couldn’t see any type of attachment points anywhere.

    To me part of the fun of owning a 4WD vehicle is being able to help others at the roadside: pull other cars out of snowbanks and ditches etc.
    I do it all the time in my Subaru, every winter.
    Are people who own Patriots with Freedom Drive I or the 5-speed manual never supposed to go off-road at all?
    Because if they do, even if they don’t help others, sooner or later they will need to get some help, and without any tow hooks at all it will be very difficult to get help, even if they go wheeling with a buddy.

    I find this very disappointing.
    Somebody correct me if I’m wrong.

  • avatar
    Ocelot

    ladies and gents ,

    i have almost read all of your posts..and i’m enjoying this so far . sorry for those who i havn’t read theirs.

    i do own a JEEP PATRIOT 2007 which is identical to 2008.

    what most of you have said about the interior is right. it’s cheap. very reliable but cheap . it’s no fancy car interior wise, and what i hate the most about this car is the engine itself ! it’s such a shame that “JEEP” produce such a poor engine power.comparing with japanese rivals they all superior the patriot engine wise, this superiority didn’t exist when the Cherokee was here !
    the engine sounds like it’s sophicating when i hit the pedal for more speed!!

    i have to give the credit for the exterior engineer because i just LOVE how it looks from the outside unlike the compass. i had so many great reviews for my car about its looks, SO MANY. it’s small but big ! it’s sporty yet family car , it’s so eyes catching vehicle. i bet anyone would hook up with a lot of chicks cause of it ;) lol

    i will narrow this down.

    my motives why i bought this car.
    1- OFFORDABLE (good price)
    2- Great looks ( HOT )
    3- fuel consumption (very econimcal)

    have a great day :)

  • avatar
    japtida55

    its funny the people giving it bad review don’t own one I just bought the limited with four wheel drive and I must say coming from 2005 all decked out pathfinder this small suv is a steal. I got fully load leather seats a phone holder built into the arm rest that you can close or leave it open to see your phone (the best feature). As far as the inside I have so much more elbow and head room in this vehicle than that big ass gas guzzling pathfinder (11.9mpg) I can actually move around comfortabley and I am big guy 6ft 280. as far as the plastic there is no more plastic in the patriot than other suvs at least this plastic is durable and does not scatch or tear easy and with 2 year old twins that is a plus. as far as how it drives the power is good enough to get you on the highways at a good speed and manuouveurs good enough to feel very comfortable in heavy traffic. if your looking for a sports car feel in suv then look else where. the patriot has the feel and look of a true SUV to me is a plus. My only complaint is you do here some road noise from the tires and the stereo could be a little better quality but other than that if you are looking for good looking great gas MPG (28mpg) that has plenty room inside to hall a couple of kids around and supplies and to do alot of everyday driving for pleasure or business there is no other small SUV that hold a candle to the patriot. I only paid 18k for this compared to 36k for the POS pathfinder I leased for the last 3 years and thank god I leased it because they wanted 19k payoff on it and only wanted to give 12k trade in for it.

  • avatar
    japtida55

    and by the way this page is supposed to be a review about the patriots half these people are talking about every car or jeep but the patriot go buy a patriot and then come post a review

  • avatar
    dohccom

    Wow, bought my 2008 patriot in Dec 2008. Stick 4×4 AWD ESP 2.4lt. Frankly the handling issues stated in the review seem bogus unless this thing got re-calibrated over time. Frankly the stick handles like my VW GTIs of the 90’s and performance is not far off. I live at 9500 ft alt in Colorado and the ESP/ handling on snow is darn awesome (like a tank on treads). I would say handling issues are not a all the issue. Issue is Tire road noise on certain types of pavement and for my ride a heck of a lot of trips to the dealer for silly stuff: Tire pressure gages off, Radio likes to change stations, funky squeak in clutch peddle etc.

    Overall not a bad ride with quality probs. Seen 31 MPG with my ride…. And runs at 80 mph from Co Springs to Denver with ease.
    http://www.dohc.com

  • avatar
    lancekoz

    Update-

    At 10K km, our 4×2 Patriot still doing well. Handling is fairly taught and lean-free, very unlike the review above, so maybe it was improved for 08. CVT should be overridden with manual feature (if you have it)on hilly or mountain freeways to reduce confusion.

    Must concur with other post, lack of towing hooks is really, really stupid. Is there an aftermarket remedy?

  • avatar
    ARBS211

    I JUST READ ALL THE PATRIOT REVIEWS.. I WAS A HAPPY 10 YEAR 1994 GRAND CHEROKEE OWNER… THEN PURCHASED A 2003 LIBERTY.. I LIVE IN A SNOWY WINTER AREA IN MI. I RECENTLY ROLLED IT OVER AND TOTALLED IT.. I ALWAYS HAD HATED DRIVING IT IN WINTER!SO NOW IM THINKING PATRIOT OR COMMANDER? GAS MPG IS DRAWING ME TOWARD THE PATRIOT LIMITED… ANY LIMITED OWNERS HAVE ANYTHING “GOOD” TO SAY?
    WANT ADVISE! THANKS

  • avatar
    rmarzolo

    I’ve owned my jeep patriot since May of 2007, got it brand new, Freedom offroad 4×4 II package, sport model manual windows, locks, by preference.. and I Love it!!! Before I owned a 1989 jeep cherokee limited for about 3 years, which I drove to 200k, The patriot is no cherokee, but the street perforance is definetly a welcome change, and improved gas milage.. snow handling is not as good, still excellent, but I probably need some snow tires to improve that aspect of it

    I’m just about to hit 36,000 miles, so I’m about to take it in for a final check up, I did get the extended warranty. Mine did come with tow hooks and I’ve used them, table topped at local off-road site, so they’re useful, and solid.. I’ve heard they can’t be attached after manufacturing, but not sure, just ask them or call the factory! I’ve gone through 2 feet of water, been from soCal to Vegas 3 times, been to San Francisco once,a nd never had any major hitches. I really love this car and would recommend it to a friend or family who like to get off road from time to time, BUT It’s no offroad monster like my old cherokee so its no replacement, but it’s a dam close 2nd.. and for the street driving, its a huge improvement.

    Remember this things built on the dodge caliber chassis, with a double reinforced A Frame, it has a CVT built by JatCo, who also makes trans for Mercedes, and the World engine, built together by hyundai, mitsubishi and Chrysler, so parts / replacements should be pretty cheap and easy to get. I take care of my Jeep, but I’m also pretty hard on it.. and it takes it, so far no complaints
    worth mentioning, except it doesnt have the straight 6 I grew to know and love.. but new car, new gas prices and a new era, really make it all OK!!!

  • avatar
    HooverBucs

    I dont know if im the only one here that actually OWNS a Jeep Patriot, but i can tell you that it is a great jeep. i average about 26mpg and it handles great, and if you are talking ground clearance, buy the FD-II package and a Rocky Road Lift kit.

    i dont know if any of you have ever heard the saying that”An artist must evolve to survive” well this is the same concept. Jeep knows that fuel efficiency will become more and more popular, and since the Wranglers and Grand Cherokees arent any Prius, they might as well make an affordable alternative that atleast embodies a jeep. even if it cant rock crawl or other such extreme off roading, i dont think that is what youll be looking to do with a patriot, if you did want extreme off road ability, then you would buy a wrangler.

    Besides, who can beat only having to fill up every 2-3 weeks? or having as much cargo space as the patriot does with out compromising leg room?

    The Pat is a great car, i recommend it 100%

  • avatar
    Teknobeam

    I recently purchased a barnd new 2009 Patriot with the sun and sound package which includes the sunroof and the touch screen sound system. I also own a 1999 Cherokee Sport and have owned a Grand Cherokee in the past. I was dubious about getting the patriot at first, but the gas mileage factor was a huge plus for me. The sound system in the vehicle is the best i have heard in any off the line vehicle. After a week of driving it I never looked back. It took a while to get a handle on the CV transmission but now i know how to make it fly. This vehicle is a winner. I love the thing.


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