By on January 8, 2007

img_0906_1.jpgI don’t mean to be [too] snarky, but why is it that whenever Bill Gates deigns to bless the little people with his e-presence, all I can do is stare at his hair? Does he cut it himself? Or is that what happens when you start racking up the billions: you let your looks go to seed and no one dares tell you your hair looks like something an amphetamine crazed Cuts 2000 trainee literally whipped-up on a bad day? I suppose there’s a no degree of separation thing here, as Bill appeared at the NAIAS (IPPI) to tell Alan (who works for Billy) that his Ford products are great and will soon be even greater with Microsoft’s electronics on board. MS WORD! These guys are denial.

You sure do bump into a celebrity or two whilst taking laps of the COBO show floor– especially if you’re dorky enough to lavish that most post modern of sobriquets on auto scribes. Why, look! It’s Consumer Reports’ David Champion. There’s Automobile Magazine’s Robert Cumberford and Jean Jennings. AutoWeek’s Dutch Mandel is hard at work. Click and Clack are right on track. I make it a point to shake everyone’s hand just so I can watch clock their face when I tell them I work for The Truth About Cars. (FYI: it’s something between blissful ignorance and bemused revulsion.)

cien.jpgI also spot Simon Cox, the GM designer responsible for the 750hp Caddy Cien from ‘02; a bad ass coupe so perfectly proportioned and cab-forward thinking that Cadillac couldn’t build it because Miami condo loads of tassel loafered DCTSTSXLRSRX owners would have died of embarrassment. Needless to say, Cox sports the sina qua non of trendy art school grads: oddly-shaped eyeglasses. It’s true. Spot a pair of frames that appear to have been fashioned by delirium tremoned hands out of a wire clothes hanger and chances are better than excellent the nose holding them aloft belongs to a guy who draws cars for a living. Martian-themed footwear is another dead giveaway.

Guess what? I found an automaker whose products you should rush out and buy. For breakfast, Mercedes proffered chocolate-and-mint yogurt shooters, savory filled croissants, proscuitto and mascarpone frittatas with fire roasted peppers, and mixed berries and cream. I rested rink side, inhaling the heady aroma of fresh-cut roses, watching figure skaters avoid being crushed beneath the all-season technology underpinning Stuttgart's latest steamroller, waiting for the waitress to bring me my ill-gotten grub. Surprisingly, there wasn’t a single beach towel on a single seat.

mini.jpgSMART, a brand born for blonde college co-eds, was populated by product specialists no older than my latest ATM withdrawal who shared their enthusiasm with such sincerity that it’s almost as if they weren’t paid actors. Between them and the PR kids [Tony] hawking Scion, the auto industry has cornered the market on marketing to the youth market. I had two questions for MINI’s mousketeers: what the hell was MINI thinking when they equipped the new Cooper S with a non-functional hood scoop? And: What in God’s name was MINI thinking when they equipped the new Cooper S with a non-functional hood scoop?

After that automotive koan was met with uncomprehending silence (and a polite smile), I took a moment to pause and reflect on the fact that the Porsche GT3 that I want to own already owns me. That and the fact that if you say "Wendelin Weideking" enough times the sound will eventually lull you into a meditative trance of sufficient depth to realize that Audi shouldn't be building a mid-engined 911 rival with the Toyota FJ Cruiser's blind spot– unless it makes shed loads of money like the Cayenne.

The Dark Lords of DCX chose to provide box lunches to the assembled throngs. The hand-out was timed to coincide with the reveal of the company’s 318th Jeep concept vehicle since purchasing the brand along with the corresponding Chrysler dregs. Yep, one fun, imaginative Jeep flight of fancy after another. And what do they bring to market?  The Compass. Talk about indigestion.

cadillaccts08.jpgWith so much free bottled water, beer, coffee, juice, beer, fruit smoothies and beer on tap, journalists soon learned the lay of the land restroom-wise. In this I was no different. Thankfully, my non-Viper snake shakeage (yes I’m a boy named Lyn) was finished in time to witness Cadillac win the Now I Know Why I Bothered to Come Award. A string quartet segued into a duo of violin-sawing rappers followed by what seems to be the entire CTS project team getting up to wax poetic about their efforts. Despite all that, the new and improved, vitamin-fortified, rich ‘n creamy CTS is a hit.

Get this: the one time GM Car Czar Maximum Bob Lutz’s BS could plausibly intersect with reality and the guy’s off burning jet fuel somewhere. Gates should give Lutz a new Outlook. Or is that the other way round?

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66 Comments on “Fear and Libations at the NAIAS (Press Day 2): Jerry Frenchie Rules!...”


  • avatar
    windswords

    Great writeup. You would think Bill Gates would have a personal stylist.

    I know how you feel about the Cadillac Cien. In the ’04 show DCX had the equally perfectly proportioned ME412 concept (850 bhp @ 5750 rpm, with 850 lb-ft. of torque) but did not (or were told not to) make it a production reality. For anyone who is interested in reading about it:
    http://www.allpar.com/cars/me412.html

  • avatar

    Wow..Gates seems to be everywhere these days…headlining CES shilling Vista then at NAIAS pushing MS electronics which might possibly bring a whole new meaning to a car crash. Hopefully they have some people from the Xbox group working on those systems.
    It seems not even photoshop can save Billy’s hair
    http://www.cesweb.org/attendees/conferences/keynotes.asp

    Back to cars..boy was that Caddy Cien a nice design!

  • avatar
    Luther

    Yup, Jeep is just scary.

    The new CTS looks OK. I wonder if this time it can handle properly.

  • avatar
    quasimondo

    There’s a host of good cars (or at least two) besides the ME-412 that DCX dropped the ball on, most notably the Razor and Firepower! (yeah, you have to add the exclamation point). Certainly the Razor would’ve been one helluva Solstice/Sky killer. Too bad they went with that dreadful Crossfire.

    Speaking of concepts, what is up with that MINI? The non-functional hood scoop is the last thing I’m worried about with that design.

  • avatar
    Lesley Wimbush

    “Non-Viper snake shakeage?”
    Bwwaaahaaaaa….that’s right up there with my own evil tank-slap.

  • avatar
    USAFMech

    Wow, talk about coincidences! I was researching Simon Cox just this afternoon. All of the new CTS pics had me wondering why the Art & Science theme wasn’t better done. The car is nicer, if less butch, but lacks the deft skills of Mr. Cox. The Sixteen is a nice reference point for the CTS, but the new car could have used a little more holistic approach. Mr. Cox’s Cien has a 3D quality that no other production Art & Science Caddy as matched.

  • avatar
    HEATHROI

    I WANT A CIEN…..NOW!!!!!

    (and doesn’t Mini wagon look like a cayenne left a little too long the dryer)

  • avatar
    Terry Parkhurst

    Yes, I think you are being too snarky. I met Bill Gates during the second Microsoft CD-ROM conference in 1987. I can still recall telling friends what I was going to do and they responded, “What’s a CD-ROM?” That’s how long ago it was in technical terms. I got to a room where Bill Gates was scheduled to read a statement about a strategic alliance between Olivetti and Microsoft; turned out I was the first journo there and found a Microsoft PR guy named Marty Taucher there with Mr. Gates. I was introduced and he was told I was covering the event for MicroTimes, a SF Bay area publication and he knew of it. He seemed cordial and generally unprepossessing. Honestly, I can’t remember much about his hair.
    I read in the Seattle Times yesterday that the product Microsoft is introducing may replace the venerable CD-player. That’s news. Will it save Ford? Well, did the CD player save Plymouth?
    In any event, I am glad someone is showing the TTAC flag at the North American International Auto Show. Someone has to keep the rest of the journos honest and stir the pot a bit.

  • avatar
    cheezeweggie

    That is the ugliest Mini I’ve ever seen. It looks like a prostitutes purse.

  • avatar
    Dr. No

    The Caddy CTS entry is more of the same, and I’m underwhelmed. They need a break-through design, not a broken one.

  • avatar
    Kman

    That is the ugliest Mini I’ve ever seen. It looks like a prostitutes purse.

    What’s with all the prostitute references on TTAC? ;-)

    About Jeep Today: I am still searching for an understanding of why bring to market the Compass? Setting aside for a minute its clumsy undesign (if the Aztek hadn’t existed, this could be a contender for ugliest vehicle), I am most concerned about the bastardization of one of the most solid, recognized BRANDs in any industry.

    In the same way that Kleenex is frequently used as a synonym for “paper tissue”, I still hear many non-car folk refer to any rugged, 4×4 SUV as a “Jeep”. Jeep coming out with the Compass is like Kleenex (the company), coming out with and selling cucumbers.

    I continue to rack my brain on DCX’s recent and ongoing approach with the Jeep brand, but can’t find reason. It certainly can’t be explained away like the Porsche Cayenne explanation (brings in cash, allows 911 to live), which I understand and value. I don’t think the Compass will bring in any spectacular cash.

    (and btw, what’s with that lame marketing campaign for the Compass?)

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    What?

    The front of the CTS is nearly perfect.

    Go Caddy.

  • avatar

    My take on the second day:

    http://www.truedelta.com/pieces/naias2.php

    The Changfeng presentation almost killed me it was so unintentionally funny. Jalopnik is uploading it onto YouTube. A must-see.

    On a totally different note, both the CTS presentation and the car itself were outstanding.

  • avatar
    Dr. No

    Hey Jonny, let’s wait and see how well the CTS nose sells then. To each his own, but to my eyes, it’s only slightly better than Michael Jackson’s….ok, that might be hyperbole. But I think it’s time for Caddy to put away the straight-edge.

    The Cien on the other hand looks great.

  • avatar
    nichjs

    the cien looks like GM threw it’s brand engineers at a lambo countach…

  • avatar
    ejacobs

    The nose on the CTS looks 2 sizes too big to me. It’ll probably sell because of it (at least at first)–a la 300?

  • avatar
    ash78

    The Cien does look great. A little Gillettish, but still cool. Btw, does “cien” have some significance–like 100th anniversary of the company or something?

    The grille treatment on the CTS is probably just keeping in step with Audi and others. Pedestrians named Jonah should steer clear ;)

  • avatar
    SherbornSean

    Lyn,
    Did you see any cars, or is your expertise limited to reviewing hair, food and eyewear?

  • avatar

    Ash78, you hit the nail on the head. The Cien was built to commemorate Cadillac’s 100th anniversary and introduced Cadillac’s “Art and Science” style motif. It was the concept car that inspired the XLR. I’d say it lost something in the translation!

  • avatar
    booboojeebies


    The new CTS looks OK. I wonder if this time it can handle properly.

    I would have never given the CTS a second look, but a buddy of mine just picked up an 05 CTS-V with less than 10K on the odometer. Gearbox aside, this car is quite fun and handles suprisingly well. If you don’t believe me – see it hold its own against the S4:

    http://youtube.com/watch?v=oZ2CPWyXr74

    Plus, I’m not aware of many 400bhp V8 cars available for 30K (a lightly used one of course). Price being a point that more car reviewers unfortunately minimize. If the V were AWD or I lived outside this snow belt I would be sold.

    That being said, the std CTS is probably another story alltogether =)

  • avatar
    kgriff1118

    Yesterday Robert wrote that Lyn was free to post “her” own opinion. Today’s Lyn is a male.
    Is anybody else confused?

  • avatar

    My defense: I live in a house with five females. Anyway, Lyn was not offended by the mistake- although his girlfriend was surprised to learn she was a lesbian (his words, not mine).

  • avatar
    JJ

    The front of the CTS is nearly perfect.

    Yes, but unfortunately, it’s the best part of the car. The C-pillar looks weird and I saw some pictures of the interior and I was less than impressed, especially with the panel gaps of the glove compartment and the area beneath the steering wheel. That looks better in most Opels.

    Then again, I’m always annoyed with these things. Look at the interior of a new S-Class; it slightly depends on the color, but the low panel on the center console, spoils the whole thing for me. That alone would be a reason to buy a CL over it.

    You won’t find that in an Audi, BMW, Lexus or even Volkswagen.

  • avatar
    Gardiner Westbound

    I considered the CTS, though the interior was a bit chintzy. My mechanic told me to take a pass because of substandard reliability. The new CTS’ interior seems improved. I hope the reliability is too.

  • avatar
    blautens

    The new CTS looks very nice…hopefully they continue the V model and fix the rear differential issues – might make me think about buying a Caddy…(oh, crap, I AM almost 40…)

  • avatar
    Alex Rashev

    Gardiner, your mechanic was wrong. So far other people’s cadillacs that I’ve been watching for the last 5 years or so have been problem free. If I recall correctly, since mid-90′s Cadillac has been making extremely reliable, easy to drive luxurymobiles of great value, second only to Lexus (maybe). Their lemon era ended with introduction of Northstar.

    As for Ford-Microsoft: if Ford was to make a product anywhere close to the refinement, quality, and support level of MS’s programs, they’d be market leader. It’s easy to bash MS for charging gazillions and still having bugs here and there, but look at the competition – it’s laughable.

    Microsoft is the Toyota of computer world, in essence; if you recall, the first Office was a complete fiasco, and so was Windows 2.1. Other office products were simply superior in every way. But after a decade of persistent, hard work, Bill’s enterprise has a near monopoly in consumer operating systems and office productivity software. I think Ford could learn a lesson or two.

  • avatar
    labrat

    New CTS Interior looks nice overall, but I can’t help thinking that the gage binnacle looks like it came from a lower level Chrysler product (Caliber, Sebring). Doh!

  • avatar
    William C Montgomery

    Lyn: I don’t mean to be [too] snarky, but why is it that whenever Bill Gates deigns to bless the little people with his e-presence, all I can do is stare at his hair? Does he cut it himself?

    Bill wanted to copy Steve Jobs’ hair style but tragically genetics was not on his side so he is left to wander in a fashion wasteland without inspiration for his coif.

  • avatar
    Claude Dickson

    The CTS does not need to be completely re-worked. The next gen CTS need only address the failings of the last gen CTS, which mostly concerned the interior. The next gen CTS will tell volumes whether GM has learned its lessons about competing in the market place.

    The two reservations I have about the CTS are mechanical reliability and depreciation. Reading in one forum that an automatic transmission shouldn’t last longer than 100k miles is less than inspiring. If this is true, the best argument for the CTS-V over the CTS is that the CTW-V only comes with a stick. Love to see actual reliability data on this car as opposed to anecdotes.

    Neither is the nose dive in value. In my area a 2 yr old CTS-V which probably listed for $50k plus new can be had with low miles for around $35k. That makes the CTS-V a great used car value and a crappy new car value.

  • avatar
    tom

    I’m no Caddy fan, but the CTS looks great. If it also measures up in terms of driving dynamics, this is one of the few American cars I could see myself in.

  • avatar
    SkiD666

    “I saw some pictures of the interior and I was less than impressed, especially with the panel gaps of the glove compartment and the area beneath the steering wheel”

    JJ – the only gaps I saw in the pictures (of the show car at least) were around the glove box, there is some space left under the wood/aluminum trim for the ambient lighting

  • avatar
    guyincognito

    Speaking of Steve Jobs vs. Bill Gates, I wonder what Ford’s partnership with Microsoft will do to the prospect of ipod connectivity in their cars.

  • avatar
    Luther

    I am a lesbian. There, Im out of the closet now and I feel much better.

    If you want to view the unvailing of the new CTS you can watch it on: media.gm.com

    It truly seems that GM is getting serious about building world-class cars. I think they realize that hucksterism/patriotism will no longer work in this age of the Internet and with sites like TTAC. But as the saying goes “Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me 16 times then suicide may be my most viable lifestyle choice”.

    I can just imagine high-level meetings at GM where TTAC is mentioned quite often. I dont doubt that higher-ups at GM are reading TTAC and getting clued-in/irritated. (Hi Bob!)

  • avatar
    disgruntled

    Microsoft is the Toyota of computer world, in essence; if you recall, the first Office was a complete fiasco, and so was Windows 2.1. Other office products were simply superior in every way. But after a decade of persistent, hard work, Bill’s enterprise has a near monopoly in consumer operating systems and office productivity software. I think Ford could learn a lesson or two.

    Well, Windows was a rip-off of the Mac OS, Internet Explorer was a rip-off of Netscape Navigator, Vista is a rip-off of Mac OSX (and isn’t as good as the previous version of OSX), the Zune is a rip-off of the iPod… so, Microsoft coming out with a new product is like McDonalds coming out with a sandwich to compete with Subway.

    For me, this is just one more reason not to buy a Ford.

  • avatar
    pfingst

    The Cien does look really cool, although it does somewhat resemble an unholy union between a Countach and a Camaro.

    But it’s not a Cadillac, or shouldn’t be, anyway. Caddy is trying to reinvent itself in the BMW mold, as a maker of sporty luxury cars. The Cien is a supercar-style pure sports car, which unfortunately for GM has no real place in the lineup. The only logical places for it would be Pontiac (the performance division), but Pontiacs are el-cheapo sport, or Chevy as a super-Vette, which the Bowtie neither needs nor wants as it would devalue the only really valuable icon they have left.

    On top of that, if you were going to buy a Cien, would you want to go to a Chevy dealer (or Pontiac, for that matter) to buy one? Even Caddy dealers aren’t all that nice by today’s standards, though I understand they’re working on that.

    Nonetheless, its a beautiful car, but I can see why GM didn’t make it. Not that common sense has ever stopped them before…

  • avatar
    Alex Rashev

    Disgruntled,
    Windows has as much to do with Mac OS as Corvette has to do with Esprit. Just because they’re both sports cars with four taillights doesn’t mean they’re a rip-off of each other.

    Ripoff or not, Win2k3 is the most stable server OS, MS Office suite is the best one out there, and MSSQL is now ruling small-to-medium SQL server markets. It all started with lowly underdog copycat projects that were laughed at.

    Remember where Toyota started – their first minivan was a poor Chrysler clone. Now, if you want a great all-around minivan, you simply buy a Sienna.

    It’s easy to innovate, it’s hard to perfect. But it’s the perfection that puts bread on your table.

  • avatar

    >>Click and Clack are right on track.

    I don’t think so. I bumped into Click (Tom Magliozzi) in a cafe in Cambridge on Sunday.

  • avatar

    Robert Farago:
    My defense: I live in a house with five females.

    You lucky son of a gun. Even if four of them are your daughters.

  • avatar
    starlightmica

    Anyway, Lyn was not offended by the mistake- although his girlfriend was surprised to learn she was a lesbian (his words, not mine).

    To paraphrase the New Yorker: On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a guy.

  • avatar
    disgruntled

    Windows has as much to do with Mac OS as Corvette has to do with Esprit. Just because they’re both sports cars with four taillights doesn’t mean they’re a rip-off of each other.

    “Microsoft modeled the first version of Windows, released in 1985, on the GUI of the Mac OS.”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Microsoft_Windows

  • avatar
    ash78

    I’ve got a name (an old Scottish male one) that is 95%+ female today in the US. It’s amazing how much nicer people are via email/internet before they learn I’m a guy. Well, maybe not always nicer, but at least more accommodating (or is it condescending?).

  • avatar

    Anyone want to identify the Jerry Frenchie in the title?

  • avatar
    SherbornSean

    Jerry Frenchie sounds like a German-French combination, which I am not ‘Smart’ enough to figure out.

    On another topic, I doubt an idiot could be so eloquent off the cuff…..
    http://www.autobloggreen.com/2007/01/09/detroit-auto-show-bob-lutz-holds-court-with-bloggers/

  • avatar
    airglow

    Kman

    ……I am still searching for an understanding of why bring to market the Compass?……

    I know many (if not most) enthusiasts hate the Compass. It’s just too bad for all of you that it is selling quite well. I just love it when a vehicle the auto press and enthusiasts rip to shreds sells well. Proves the point that the overlap between what auto journalists/enthusiasts like and what the general public likes is very small. Other examples are FWD, the Camry, SUV’s, Crossover SUV’s, VW’s, the Ridgeline, etc.

  • avatar
    NICKNICK

    airglow–

    well, the average IQ is 100. half of the people you meet are below that. that is why the compass is selling well.

  • avatar
    Lyn Vogel

    SherbornSean: Lyn,
    Did you see any cars, or is your expertise limited to reviewing hair, food and eyewear?

    Just wait ’til Pt. 3, when I dish on the lousy Canadian TV channels.

  • avatar
    Lyn Vogel

    David Holzman: I don’t think so. I bumped into Click (Tom Magliozzi) in a cafe in Cambridge on Sunday.

    Er, the above report is from Monday, day 2.

  • avatar

    ash78:
    I’ve got a name (an old Scottish male one) that is 95%+ female today in the US.

    Gerald Ford was born Leslie Lynn King (Jr., I believe). (His father was an abusive alcoholic, his mother remarried when he was very young, and he got the new name.)

  • avatar
    Alex Rashev

    Disgruntled,
    Development of Windows 1.0 started in 1982, 2 years before MAC 128K hit the shelves. In fact, both operating systems are heavily based on Xerox’s GUI implementation. By the way, guess who supplied office productivity suite for those first MACs.

    Think of this as Fiero vs MR2. Both look similar, one got a year’s worth of headstart, and both are actually pocket versions of Lotus Esprit. Doesn’t mean that any one of those three is a ripoff.

    Industries tend to have a lot of parallels. Whether you’re building computers, plastic toys, or gas-turbine generators, the principle is the same – to give your customer the best value. Microsoft did it, Toyota did it – and both are prosperous. On the other hand, those who just capitalized on giving people “today’s marvels” remained niche players at best, and debt-laden rotting mega-corporations at worst.

  • avatar
    Mullholland

    Robert: The site is great fun. Keep up the good work. Trivia though is always a powerful response tool for any gearhead. Jerry Frenchie is a resident of Novi, Michigan and a Cadillac owner.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Yeah, a word on the Xerox thing. The day Steve Jobs walked into the PARC Facility and wound up stealing (so to speak) GUI, there were two other technologies on the table.

    One was email and the other was Ethernet.

    Jobs saw them, he just didn’t think they had any value.

    Anyhow, PARC developed most all the personal computing stuff we all know and love. Even the laser-printer!

  • avatar
    disgruntled

    That was 25 years ago. I hardly think they “developed” the GUI. Apple was the first personal computer to use color and different fonts. Oh yeah, they invented a little thing called the mouse. Anyone who has ever used a Fisher-Price toy could have came up with the idea for a GUI, it’s a no brainer. And yes, Vista is a shameless rip-off of OSX. Functionally and aesthetically.

    Hmm, one thing Microsoft is good at is making a simple task a multi-step process. Just think, if they rip-off BMW’s iDrive and make it even more tedious, it will be a disaster for Ford.

  • avatar
    wsn

    Extremely disappointed with the CTS exterior. The old CTS is perfect. But the grille of the new one is simply too large and lost the proper proportion.

    It’s just like all the new houses with out-of-proportionly large windows. Even a dog can design a house with large windows; but only an accomplished architect knows exactly how large or small it should be.

    Same for car design. Increase the size of that grille by 20% and you have moved from sheer elegance to uber ugliness.

  • avatar
    Alex Rashev

    First mouse was also a Xerox PARC development, at least the common ball mouse kind. Early 70′s, a decade before MAC.

    Same with color display, IIRC even the original Spectrum 48 had one.

    As for Vista and OSX, both are heavily based on 7-8 year old Linux skins. Nothing new here, especially considering that OSX is also a Unix variant.

    You can’t just copy successful products and expect to survive in the computer software/hardware market. Doesn’t work this way. You have to look at unsuccessful, but promising designs, and make them successful. That’s what MAC, MS, and everybody else have been doing/trying to do for the last 20 years or so.

    Notice any parallels to the car market?

  • avatar

    I did not meet Lyn at the show, but can attest that the voice on his voicemail was male. However, Lyn’s girlfriend likely has access to more extensive evidence, and she seems to be thinking that she is now a lesbian. So I’m not sure what to think. But if Lyn wants to be considered male, I guess I’m fine with that.

    On the new CTS, it looks great. I’m no fan of the big grilles on Audis, but the thought that the CTS’ grille is too big has not crossed my mind. Things can look different in photos than they do in person. In person this car looks great, especially in silver. (Designers love silver because it is the best color for showing off a car’s lines.)

    I personally loved the presentation. But then I’ve long been a proponent of giving the people who create a car more public exposure, both to give the company an authentic human face and to give these people a more direct sense of why they do the work they do. These were the real people who made the car, not actors (I new a few from my time inside GM conducting research for my Ph.D.)

    On the food, the boxed sandwich from DCX was on par with one you’d grab from the fridge in a 7-11 and the Mercedes stand offered up a sorbet later in the day that turned out to be wasabi-soy. I learned this by tasting it–the server didn’t know the flavor. Innovative, but you don’t want one.

    The crack marketers at Chanfeng wish everyone here a day full of momentum and great dignity.

  • avatar
    disgruntled

    Gee Alex, you’re right. What was I thinking?

    Windows Vista

    The Redmond Copying Machine?

  • avatar
    NickR

    Lyn, a few more of those fattie treats and you’ll have to sell your Caterham and move on to a Lucerne.

  • avatar
    Alex Rashev

    Disgruntled, you’re kidding me – mac fan websites? What’s next, peak oil prognostications?

    Working as an application developer, I can tell you right away: we look at other people’s products, and we try to match features. There’s no other way, that’s what business is all about. Why reinvent the bicycle, when you can just make a better one? Revolutions capture spotlights, but evolutions do all the grunt work.

    Still don’t get what I’m hinting at?

    Now, I happen to have an MSDN copy of Vista on my desk, together with my co-worker’s brand new MAC laptop. I’ve used every major MS and *nix OS, from 3.1 and OS/2 to Linux and 2003. I got my first Spectrum at the age of 5. I also happen to have a Microsoft insider in the family :)

    With the above authority, I say Vista is not an OSX ripoff, and is an improvement over both WinXP AND OSX. Care to elaborate why my opinion has less foundation under it it than yours?

  • avatar
    disgruntled

    It’s pretty obvious that Microsoft copied OS X when developing Vista, right down to the weather widget… err, I mean “gadget”—they practically use the same terms; this is a company that seriously lacks an imagination.

    I’m through trashing them now, curious though, with all the viruses on Windows, I wonder what will happen in the future when someone plugs a Zune (iPod rip-off) into a Ford running Microsoft software?

  • avatar
    Alex Rashev

    I don’t recall X-Box having any viruses period. Don’t forget that it’s pretty much a fancy PC. But wait, check this out:

    http://www.apple.com/support/windowsvirus/

    xBox: 1
    iPod: 0

    ;)

    Not to be a snob, but I think you display exactly the kind of ignorance that this very same website is fighting against. Stop being stubborn and go check out Vista. You’ll like it.

  • avatar
    Somethingtosay

    # Frank Williams:
    January 9th, 2007 at 9:51 am

    Ash78, you hit the nail on the head. The Cien was built to commemorate Cadillac’s 100th anniversary and introduced Cadillac’s “Art and Science” style motif. It was the concept car that inspired the XLR. I’d say it lost something in the translation!

    No, Sir!

    It was the Cadillac Evoq that inspired the XLR.

  • avatar
    Somethingtosay

    # Gardiner Westbound:
    January 9th, 2007 at 10:14 am

    I considered the CTS, though the interior was a bit chintzy. My mechanic told me to take a pass because of substandard reliability. The new CTS’ interior seems improved. I hope the reliability is too.

    What did you purchase instead?

  • avatar
    disgruntled

    Alex, you post a link to a Windows virus infecting Windows compatible iPods and somehow think that’s good for the xBox, or Ford for that matter? Then you post a score between a game console and an mp3 player? Could you be more nonsensical? Do you walk around in a Mr. Magoo haze? You call the New York Times a Mac fansite, so you must. Maybe if Vista had leap-frogged OS X instead of emulating it, then we wouldn’t be having this argument. You say that Ford can learn something from Microsoft. Like what? Learn how to make a bloated piece of software like Word? Yeah, maybe Ford will make a Hummer. By the way, I drive a Toyota, and Microsoft is no Toyota. Maybe if Toyota had just came out with their first hybrid a few months ago that was a carbon copy of its competitors, and the competition just revealed their third generation hybrid/sports car (read iPod phone) to compete with the 911, then you might have something. As far as companies improving their products over time, that’s nothing new. In fact, maybe Microsoft could learn something from Ford by looking at the Ford GT and asking themselves, why can’t we design a product that’s as passionate as that?

  • avatar
    Alex Rashev

    That was sarcasm.

    Point here is that an MP3 player, gaming console, or onboard car computer is about as susceptible to viruses as a granite rock, so you should stop branding every MS product as buggy and virus-infested. They make some damn fine mice, and you don’t see those having bugs or viruses.

    As for what Ford could learn from Microsoft: turning a profit, for a change. A company that just keeps making billion after billion must be making something right.

  • avatar
    disgruntled

    Point here is that an MP3 player, gaming console, or onboard car computer is about as susceptible to viruses as a granite rock…

    Uhm, you posted a link to a virus that had infected an mp3 player, so you’re contradicting yourself. Just because no one has yet written an xBox virus, doesn’t mean it won’t happen. Ditto for cars that might someday be plugged into the internet.

    As for what Ford could learn from Microsoft: turning a profit, for a change. A company that just keeps making billion after billion must be making something right.

    The automobile market is a very different beast than the software market, especially when almost every computer is shipped with Windows preinstalled. Imagine if every new house sold came with a Ford in the garage?

  • avatar
    Alex Rashev

    That was sarcasm.


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