By on October 24, 2006

07lincolnmkxcuv_02.jpgWhat became of the ninth-generation Lincoln Mark series? Somewhere in the Lincoln brand's twisted nomenclature there is a missing link: a connection between the rip-snorting Mark VIII and Lincoln’s cute-ute Mark X. I mean MKX. While no one at Lincoln's brand-awareness roadshow bought this Houstonian's sly attempt to realign the disjointed Mark series, they still handed me a set of keys to their latest crossover vehicle and told me to go play. Well fair enough.

I came, I saw and I found the irony: the MKX’ waffle-iron grille harkens back to the much-loved suicide door Continentals; cars that transported Presidents with three-letter titles of their own. Just in case you missed the history lesson, Lincoln’s placed a gigantic star front and center. It reminds all and sundry that this luxo-crossover isn't a wannabe Lexus– it’s a rebadged Ford. Other than the tasteful front schnoz and LED lamps out back, there's little to differentiate the Lincoln MKX from its stable mate, the Ford Edge.

07lincolnmkxcuv_11.jpgIf the Edge didn't exist, the MKX's sheetmetal would portend a strong future for the Lincoln brand. But there is a Ford Edge, and it’s ready to overpopulate a dealership near you. Which leaves the newborn MKX wishing Toyota was more like Ford: give the mundane Highlander a nose job, slap on some "RX" badges and call it a day. And Lincolnians wishing Ford was more like Toyota: give me some new, distinctive sheetmetal, please.

If there is an upside to badge engineering, the MKX's interior is it. Lincoln’s added megadoses of near-luxury spizzarkle to the Edge’s elegant, capable and comfortable living space. Door panels blend soft vinyl, lustrous wood and chrome. An armrest crafted with genuine triple-stitched decadence encourages limb relaxation. The somewhat supportive seats are well padded for touring duty, aided by a posterior cooling system that's strong enough to give you the impression you’ve wet your pants.

07lincolnmkxcuv_15.jpg The MKX’ dash gets the Lincoln brand's trademark combination of satin-nickel bling, blonde wood and delightful chrome accents. Aside from the less-than-Lexian leather on the steering wheel, the cabin looks and feels suitably posh. In true crossover style, the MKX’ mad quick D-pillar reduces storage space to traditional car standards (genuine SUV’s breathe easy). You could fold down the rear seats or… get someone else to drive, hop in back, open the panoramic sunroof shades, plug in the iPod, crank up the fourteen-speaker THX audio, and bliss out on soaring highs and full-bodied bass, as inclement weather passes you by.

Combining a high and mighty stance, 18" wheels, adaptive headlight aimers, all-wheel drive and a 265hp V6, the MKX boldly goes wherever the Hell quasi-SUV’s are supposed to go– or not go. Although building a Lincoln without a proper V8 underhood remains an indictable offense in many southern states, Ford's latest Duratec dynamo makes respectable torque from idle to 4000rpm. Lashed to a six-cog automatic, the MKX is quick enough for government work (you can file your taxes in the time it takes to get from zero to sixty). While the MKX’ “luxury tuned” chassis and suspension err on safety's side, the CUV’s unitary construction allows a surprising measure of poise through the turns– you know, for a vehicle that weighs 4420 pounds with 60% of its weight over its nose.

07lincolnmkxcuv_03.jpgEven better, the more-than-merely adequate driving dynamics don’t degrade the Lincoln’s luxury ride quality. The MKX is no Town Car, but its McPherson struts (front) and new four-link independent suspension (rear) murder most road imperfections with silent ease. The stoppers are equally impressive: willing disc brakes attached to a linear pedal pull the cute Lincoln down from speed with ample reserves of whoa Nellie. Aside from a smattering of road noise from the cargo area, the MKX does indeed feel like a proper luxury car. I mean, SUV. Er, CUV.

And you pay a proper price for the privilege. Lincoln’s MKX is roughly $4500 harder on your wallet than a comparable Ford Edge, which has the same powertrain, chassis and moonroof, and can be ordered with the same navigation system, up-rated audio and a fine leather interior of its own. So what's to love about the MKX? A retro grille, better warranty, woodgrain accents, A/C seats and luxury tuned (i.e. less sporting) dynamics. Yup, it’s the Lincoln Zephyr all over again.

Overlook the neglected Town Car (since it's still the top breadwinner even without promotion) and there isn't a single Lincoln that wears unique sheetmetal. After a few months’ fleet sales, profit-killing rebates and sweetheart lease terms, corporate spinmeisters will proclaim MKX's sales "increased market share and conquest sales by such-and-such percent.” But Lincoln's progression from absolutely nothing to almost nothing will hardly be a triumph. Lexus-style profit margins require plenty of masquerading metal and a bit of one-offsmanship. Anything less just ain’t gonna cut it. Anything more from Lincoln would be a surprise, and a long-overdue one at that.

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79 Comments on “Lincoln MKX Review...”


  • avatar
    Sid Vicious

    Why does Ford absolutely refuse to spend money on new sheet metal? I’m baffled.

    Zephyr all over again, indeed. Shouldn’t “luxury” mean at least a powertrain upgrade? C’mon. Throw us a bone.

    Who buys this stuff?

  • avatar
    starlightmica

    Remember the days when FoMoCo did have different sheet metal for their platform-mates? 1995 Continental, 1996 Taurus & Sable come to mind. The MKX’s interior look less differentiated from the Edge’s than the Zephyr’s vs. Fusion, looking at the pictures.

    This badge engineering is not a Bold Move by any means. It does make Toyota look good by comparison, as they have enough money to crank out different sheet metal and interiors for their 3 different US divisions.

  • avatar
    ash78

    The following pretty well summarizes the entire state of Ford:

    If the Edge didn’t exist, the MKX’s sheetmetal would portend a strong future for the Lincoln brand.

    Looks like another case of giving 90% when the market is demanding 110%. I’m especially appalled at Ford’s relative shortcomings in the US, since they have a pretty robust and competitive European lineup to compare to.

  • avatar
    Ar-Pharazon

    From my understanding, this problem has finally been acknowledged and will be fixed . . . hopefully this will be the last ‘badge engineered’ Lincoln you see.

  • avatar
    New2LA

    It’s just sad…

  • avatar

    I’ll believe that when I don’t see it.

  • avatar
    SherbornSean

    Nice review, very accurate.

    For a while there, I thought FoMoCo had a good strategy of using Mercury as the “Ford with Chrome” division and giving unique product to Lincon. Well, unique in the sense of being based on European platforms, but still having unique styling and performance characteristics.

    But with the Mark-MDX, Mark-Zephyr and Aviator, Lincoln appears to be going backwards.

    I think you can make a credible argument that there is hope for Cadillac. I’m not sure you can for Lincoln.

  • avatar
    BruceA

    The problem is that the Lincoln should have had the Mazda CX-7 styling. Those things are selling like crazy in Nowheresville, Canada where I reside, and I have to admit look good on the road.

    The Edge and the MKX look like squat, brickish uglies by comparison, and the equally strange-looking Acura RDX is simply doomed by the CX-7′s lower price and much better looks.

  • avatar

    They've acknowledged the problem and claimed to have a plan to fix it many times. Problem is, plans don't happen by themselves. Time for bold actions to go with the bold words. It’s bad enough that there doesn’t appear to be $4,500 in extras over the Ford. But how about some real tough sledding: MKX vs. MDX (the vehicles, not the Acura lawsuit over the name). Equip the Lincoln up to the Acura (heated seats, sunroof, satellite radio), and the difference is about $1,835. Adjust for the Acura's extra features, including the third row seat, and the difference drops to $165 based on my site's current calculations. Easy call between these two. Let's just say that with three kids I'd like a third row, and that SH-AWD works.

    My review of the Acura: http://www.epinions.com/content_268543299204

    My price comparison site, used to generate the above comparisons:
    http://www.truedelta.com/prices.php

  • avatar
    guyincognito

    I disagree that this is the Zephyr all over again. This vehicle is less differentiated from its sibling and justifies its extra money even more poorly than the Zephyr did.

  • avatar
    jazbo123

    Great review, you managed to admit it was a good vehicle but still pointed out the shortcomings of the Lincoln stewardship. "willing disc brakes attached to a linear pedal pull the cute Lincoln down from speed with ample reserves of whoa Nellie." Great phrase, worthy of Sherman T. Potter!

  • avatar

    I need to drive them both before deciding, but suspect, like guyincognito, that there is less difference here than between the Zephyr/MKX and Fusion. I’ve driven the Zephyr and Mercury Milan back-to-back, and they feel very little alike. On the exterior, they have unique front and rear fenders.

    The interior seems to be the largest point of differentiation with the SUVs. The Lincoln’s better be super nice.

  • avatar
    jazbo123

    Would I pay an extra 4.5k over the Ford version? Maybe not, but if it gets down to 3k, it will be worth the extra $ for the added luxury and cachet.

    Too bad about the lack of external differentiation though.

  • avatar
    Steve_S

    What’s the purpose of 3 brands when 2 out of the 3 brands have nothing unique? There isn’t a single Mercury that isn’t a Ford with a different grill. And more or less the same for Lincoln. And how could this not be acknowledged 20 years ago and dealt with then? Just now in 2006 they say “Oh, yah know, almost exact copies of cars are not fooling anyone anymore so maybe we should not do it.” How stupid do you need to be?

    Lincoln needs to be bold American luxury and Mercury needs to be European styling with premium interiors above Honda but below Audi. Or what would really be Bold is go Italian styling with Mercury and make it really sexy with design cues from Alfa, Ferrari. Or even easier make Mercury the Aston Martin and Jaguar styling on the cheap. A pretty package will sell cars, a pretty package and quality will sell more cars.

    Ford: The every man vehicle.
    Mercury: Entry level luxury vehicle with style (on par with Acura and Infiniti).
    Lincoln: Bold American luxury vehicle on par with Benz but cheaper.
    Volvo: Fine as it is, leave them be.
    Mazda: Give them some more money and make them even more the BMW on the cheap than they are now.

  • avatar
    Jon Furst

    Wouldn’t you need a feature-for-feature comparison to really get an idea if one was worth more than the other? Or is $4500 the difference when similarly equipped?

  • avatar
    jazbo123

    …Based on what Sajeev described. I’m assuming the loaded Ford is about equal to the Lincoln + the Linc has cooled seats and nicer interior. That’s worth about 3k to me.

  • avatar
    Brian E

    Michael: why’s that review of the MDX hiding on Epinions?

  • avatar
    McAllister

    How/why did someone come up with the name MKX?? What moron decided that rolling “em-kay-ex” off the tongue was cooler or easier than “mark ten”?

    Boggles the mind.

    M

  • avatar
    Steven T.

    It would be interesting to know the backstory to Lincoln’s recent binge of badge engineering. This is out of character for the brand (last occurring in the early 1950s). Was the product pipeline that empty that Ford felt the need to stoop to badge engineering as a stop-gap measure? Or was this a consciously planned Lincoln downsizing?

    If latter, was it linked to plans to either phase out Mercury and/or Lincoln? For example, a badge-engineered line of Lincolns sans any V8s might make more sense if Mercury went away and Lincoln were shifted down to a near-luxury brand, with the Ford’s European brands picking up most of the slack.

    Of course, the badge engineering could reflect both strategies. The most disturbing aspect of Ford’s management has been its lack of a steady hand. Whatever else you can say about Lutz, he doesn’t appear to be easily spooked.

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    I have always liked Lincoln. They always epitomized a bit more exclusivity than Caddy, a bit more understated style, maybe. At any rate, I sat in a two year old LS the other day being used as a loaner by a friend whose excellent Mazda 6 was in the shop, I was quite frankly amazed at how crappy it was. If it was not for the copious Lincoln badges all over everything, I would have never guessed it was one. I hope it was the dealership beater.

    A few years ago at the Greenwich CT Concours, I saw a brilliant slab sided Lincoln design study. It was a magnificent rendition of the suicide door Continentals; I was stunned at how beautiful it was.

    Of course Ford did not pursue it.

    That’s what Lincoln needs, in my humble opinion. But since everyone supposed to want truck wanna be’s, I suppose we won’t be seeing it. Damn.

  • avatar
    Scottie

    4400+ lb

    that car needs a diet

  • avatar
    factotum

    The Google ads for this review say it all: “Deep discounted Lincoln deals”

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    Thank you all for reading, and your insightful comments.

    “Remember the days when FoMoCo did have different sheet metal for their platform-mates? 1995 Continental, 1996 Taurus & Sable come to mind. “

    starlightmica: The ’96 Taurus and Sable shared a lot of sheetmetal, not to mention the same interior. And, they didn’t do so hot. If Ford really wants to survive they need something like the 1988 Taurus, Sable, and Continental. The Sable shared nothing except the doors (and it destroyed its competition from Buick, Oldsmobile, Chrysler) with the Taurus and the Continental was so frickin’ different it was almost a unique platform in itself.

    From my understanding, this problem has finally been acknowledged and will be fixed . . . hopefully this will be the last ‘badge engineered’ Lincoln you see.

    Ar-Pharazon: I hope you are right. Dearborn’s reputation is less than stellar, I really thought they’d learn from the Versailles and never look back. But its the late 1970s all over again.

  • avatar
    dean


    jazbo123:

    Would I pay an extra 4.5k over the Ford version? Maybe not, but if it gets down to 3k, it will be worth the extra $ for the added luxury and cachet.

    Hey, someone who knows how to spell “cachet.” You don’t see that often in internet forums.

    I have to quibble with your use of the word, though. How long has it been since Lincoln had any cachet? I suppose the Navigator might have gained it some gangsta’ cachet…

  • avatar
    Sid Vicious

    Roots of the problem:

    Ford refuses to spend the amount of money it takes and -

    “Let’s kill Mercury”

    “No – Wait. Keep it”

    “Let’s try to make Lincoln like BMW”

    “No – Wait. Let’s redefine ‘American Luxury’”.

    Ford can’t make a decision and stick with it. So I think that someone in charge decides to kill a brand, then he gets sacked, and then the next guy decides they want to keep the brand, then they have to come up with vehicles fast and cheap. Hence the badge engineering.

    Half-assed is worse than not at all. Maybe – just maybe – the recent awakening is enough. But the question is will they have enough time and money to pull it off.

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    dean: The ‘Gator has plenty of cachet, and the long wheelbase one has plenty of cache too. (rim-shot, cymbal crash)

  • avatar
    ash78

    I don’t believe Lincoln has any luxury cachet to people under 30. In my mind as a kid, it was for people who couldn’t afford a Ford (they say that kids’ opinions are often the purest)…otherwise, why would all these dealers be called “Ford-Lincoln-Mercury”?!

    I’m sure the Navigator helped their case, but I’ve always had a lot more respect for a fully-loaded Expedition at around $15k less(?). The Navi is just too stereotyped, IMO: it’s either gangster or…gangster. The exact flavor just depends on whether you’re in suburban New Jersey or here in Birmingham, Alabama.

  • avatar
    blautens

    The more I look at it, it’s the Lincoln’s take on an RX330 – it’s based on a sedan platform, has only adequate power, it has little cargo room because of the steeply raked (allegedly stylish) D-pillar, has plenty of content (NAV, leather, cooled seats, etc.) and has no pretentions of being a 3rd row mommy-mobile.

    I don’t think I’ll be trading in our RX330 on it anytime soon, though. But I do know people who LOVE our RX but couldn’t possibly own anything other than a domestic who will snatch this up, though.

  • avatar

    This would’ve made a great Mercury.

    Mercury as it is today needs to go away. Lincoln should turn into Mercury. Mercury MKZ, Mercury MKX, etc…but change the crap alphanumeric names into storied Mercury names like Marauder or whatever the hell else Mercury had. I do like the idea of giving them Italian styling that Steve S had.

    Lincoln should be a start from scratch effort targeting Audi or Mercedes.

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    You’re right, this would make a great Mercury. Ditto the Zephyr/MKZ.

    Jaguar (and maybe Volvo ) has gotta go before Mercury and Lincoln will ever get decent product. And selling off PAG will net more cash than killing off Lincoln and Mercury.

  • avatar
    jazbo123

    This would’ve made a great Mercury.

    GREAT point Cory.

  • avatar

    I agree with you Sajeev….PAG’s gotta go. Ford raped them of all the tech and know how that they need, so let them go and let your founding companies flourish again.

    Has PAG made profit yet, Volvo aside?

  • avatar

    I calculated the $4,500 using my site. Works out like this…

    Base to base is $8,800. But to get the 18s and features that are standard on the Lincoln you need the SEL trim, 18-inch wheels ($395), and Premium Package ($1,555). This yields an MSRP difference of $4,855. Still a few features on one but not the other, like heated seats with driver memory on the Ford and a power passenger seat and wood trim on the Lincoln. Adjusting for these narrows the gap to $4,530.

    This is the number my site yields after adjusting for feature differences, it’s as apples-to-apples a number as I’ve been able to come up with. Essentially, you’re paying about $4,500 for the non-quantifiable differences (i.e. styling, suspension tuning, interior materials other than the wood).

    I haven’t seen a complete features list for either vehicle yet. The Ford likely has the exterior temp gauge and tire pressure monitor that I list as standard on the Lincoln. So these numbers might be off by $125 or so.

    Including different features in the comparison will yield different results, but usually the final difference calculation remains in the same ballpark. I did a little playing around, and got results from $4,250 to $4,800. Best thing is to do your own comparisons, with the other vehicle of your choosing (I checked out the MDX earlier in the thread):

    http://www.truedelta.com/prices.php

  • avatar

    Regretably, I’ve been noticing Lincoln slipping for a while now. I’ve got a 1997 Mark VIII and a 1986 Town Car, and I love them both dearly. Owning these cars nearly 10 years apart gives me a unique oppurtunity to see where Lincoln started to stray.
    The Mark VIII is a work of art in my opinion, but once you start to drive it, you’ll realise that it doesn’t quite have the same class as the “old school” lincolns. it’s little things you notice. like the harsh sounds of the turn signal flasher and electronic chime, (Tell me, why do you need a “key-in-ignition chime” when you’ve got a keypad on the door?) less-than-exciting instrument cluster, and easily broken plastic window controls.

    In other places they’ve nailed it. the leather seats are as supportive as anything else out there. I have friends with Accords and Passats who want to find a way to put them in their own cars. The DOHC V8 has plenty of power, and the LED interior lighting, and Neon tail lamp attract further compliments. It’s a shame they don’t still make these cars.

    What I’d really like to see are all of these good features stressed and improved in the new versions, but bring back the cushy “American Class” of the old Lincolns. Can you still get the “flying sofa” embroidered plush seats in the Town Car? How ’bout my fingertip steering? I wouldn’t anything else in my cross-country cruiser. THX Audio is great. Hang on to that. LED lighting looks fantastic, and doesn’t burn out (often.) Make every bulb an LED. Air suspension across the line. Advertise High-tech, American luxury.

    Please, Lincoln. I’ve seen one amazing concept car after another. I know you can do it.

  • avatar

    They did give us a few amazing concept cars a couple of years ago. Producing that Continental would have put them back on the map, it was beautiful, contemporary, and Lincoln, all at once. The upcoming MKS looks nice, but nothing about it is distinctive.

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    Base to base is $8,800. But to get the 18s and features that are standard on the Lincoln you need the SEL trim, 18-inch wheels ($395), and Premium Package ($1,555). This yields an MSRP difference of $4,855.

    Michael, there was no window sticker on my tester, but I’ve spec’d it on Lincolns website (Elite package, AWD, fully loaded) and it was right under $45,000. A similar Edge SEL AWD is $37,500 or about $7500 less. I verified this on Edmunds too.

    Roughly eight grand is a BIG difference for the same basic product.

    Has PAG made profit yet, Volvo aside?

    I think Aston did for a couple of quarters. But its been a losing venture ever since its inception. If it was any other industry, such a dog of an undertaking would have been canned years ago.

  • avatar
    Frank Williams

    Has PAG made profit yet, Volvo aside?

    PAG third quarter loss as reported in yesterday’s Detroit Free Press:
    Pretax loss of $593 million. That compares with a pretax loss of $108 million a year ago. Sales dipped to $6.5 billion from $6.8 billion a year ago.

  • avatar

    First, you’re not comparing the same basic product, as the Lincoln you spec’d out had many features on it that you cannot get on the Ford. The THX audio is a grand of that. Don’t think it’s worth a grand? Then don’t get the Elite package.

    Second, I suspect you priced both vehicles with the sunroof and the ceiling-mounted entertainment system, as it’s not possible to get the Lincoln to just under 45 otherwise. But you cannot get both together, for obvious reasons. The perils of using Edmunds without reading the fine print. Takes much longer that way, too.

    Finally, there are plenty of cars with at least an $8,000 spread. How about an Escalade compared to a Tahoe ($18,000 base to base)? A Camry LE V6 compared to a Lexus ES ($9,900)?

    Price comparisons are fairly meaningless unless you equate the content. Otherwise, you’d have to conclude that options are never worth the money.

    I created my site to enable quicker, more accurate price comparisons. And that’s what it delivers.

  • avatar
    Ar-Pharazon

    I personally think Lincoln was started down the extreme badge-engineered path due to it’s association with the PAG group. Lincoln became the red-headed stepchild in PAG instead of the company’s real ‘premier’ brand. In comparison to Jag, Aston, or Volvo, Lincoln just seemed so . . . ordinary. The others were much ‘sexier’ to the muckety-muck corporate types . . . they’re all European, after all! So poor old Lincoln was left to make due, and wither.

    I stand by my statement that this has stopped. Wait and see.

    Of course for some of you unless you’re personally consulted on every detail of what an upcoming Lincoln should be you’ll still holler ‘badged’. But that’s to be expected . . . nonetheless, the egregious badging will stop.

  • avatar

    If you read my review of the Zephyr/MKZ you’d know I’m not one to just scream “badge engineering!”

    The problem is that too often GM and Ford have claimed they were going to stop doing it, then fell back into their old habits. Until the tooling is bought, nothing is set in steel. I do hope you’re right about the future, but I’m not counting on it.

  • avatar
    Ar-Pharazon

    The real irony is that I believe that the Edge may actually be a badge-engineered Lincoln . . . cobbled up rather quickly to address the impending Explorer fiasco. Originally supposed to be the Aviator . . .

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    Micheal, yes I mistakenly selected the rearseat DVD on both models when you can have that with the big roof.

    I guess my problem is that the Edge is pretty damn nice for $35k. Maybe too nice. That’s a lot of “Edge” for Lincoln to build on, even if its lacking 5 extra speakers, A/C seats, woodgrain, free loaner cars, etc.

  • avatar
    jrogers

    While the badge-engineering that is now Lincoln is pathetic, it is not too hard to understand. Take a look at the financial results announced yesterday. FMC simply does not have the resources to make Lincoln into the marque it should and could be, especially given the money required to prop up Jaguar and Land Rover. In addition, Ford has never seen Lincoln success as a strategic requirement, unlike GM which sees Cadillac as critical. Thus even in the good times Lincoln never had the resources it needed, and there is little chance this will change in the forseeable future.

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    And that’s precisely why PAG’s gotta go. Its never worked and it makes everyone else suffer.

  • avatar

    PAG was supposed to carry its own weight, and then some. The goal was $1.5b in profits per year.

    Volvo is still doing well, and Land Rover isn’t doing badly. The big mis-step was with Jaguar. They weren’t able to sufficiently reduce manufacturing costs, and the styling of the new XJ is too bland. People blame the X-Type, but that’s just part of the problem with Jag. The largest problem is that very few people even consider a Jag.

    On Lincoln, Ford simply made to many bad plays. They spent a lot of money on the last Continental, yet few people wanted it. They spent even more on the LS, but it was too generic for people to notice it. The Mark VIII wasn’t as attractive as the Mark VII (one of my favorites back in the 1980s). And they bet too heavily on the Navigator.

    The biggest mistake of all: changing directions every couple of years. As I’ve said often before, I’d expect a family-controlled firm to have a longer-term perspective and be more stable. The Toyota family has served Toyota this way, even though it does not control the company. But the opposite has been the case with Ford.

  • avatar

    @ McAllister

    I believe the MKX was an ATAT type vehicle from the Command and Conquer PC game series.

    It certainly has the look.

  • avatar
    f8

    So the cheapest MKX starts at about $35K MSRP, and the cheapest Infiniti FX35 starts at $38K. That extra $3 grand for the FX will buy you more horsepower, much better styling, better resale value, RWD (versus Lincoln/Edge’s FWD), and better reliability (at least when comparing brand averages).

  • avatar

    The Infiniti starts $3,655 higher. But it also includes a number of extra standard features:

    –power liftgate
    –roof rails
    –rearview monitor
    –power tilt/tele wheel
    –xenon lights
    –heated seats
    –memory seat
    –and so on…

    The Lincoln has a few extras, but not nearly as many. Adjust for these differences, and the Infiniti is only abuot $1,900 more.

    OUCH.

    Anyone else think incentives are baked into the pricing of the MKX?

    Maybe you don’t agree with the values I assign to features. Well, my site lets members assign their own in this case, to get a personalized comparison based on how much these features are worth to you.

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    And the Infiniti has no direct counterpart at Nissan Dealers.

  • avatar
    starlightmica

    Sajeev -

    Thanks for pointing out the even greater differentiation with the 1st gen Taurus/Sable/Continental – I’m not sure anyone else would remember, so I chose the more recent revision. The 1st gen cars all had different dashboards, as you pointed out, instead of the hideous oval bulge in the center of the dash about to burst like a baby Alien in the 2nd gen.

    Ford was making money hand over fist just 8 or so years ago. Sad to see how far they’ve fallen, and how if they paid more attention to the worst case scenario that this sorry state of affairs could have been prevented.

    I’ll admit I have a soft spot for FoMoCo, an eggplant hued 1971 Torino Brougham sedan being our first car when we came to the ‘States. Of course, the AC didn’t work, the roll-down windows broke, the radio got no reception, Dad called it a lemon, but I was an impressionable kid back then. I even thought the Mustang II was the greatest thing on wheels, and fondly recall the factory tour in the mid-seventies.

  • avatar
    maxo

    I think the FX exterior looks like the designer was doing drugs, but at least it doesn’t look too much like a murano. I see this genre as having a continuum of styling from the conservative lincoln em-kay-edge to the crazy FX, with the lexus in the middle. Comparing the lincoln to the infiniti may not always be valid from a buyer’s perspective. Maybe Karesh should run it against the Pacifica?

    Neverminding whether my statement is true or not, do you guys actually like the look of the FX?

  • avatar

    I didn’t used to like the FX, but it’s grown on me. Same with the totally unrelated Murano, which appears to have been Ford’s target vehicle.

    The designers over at Hyundai clearly love it. At least I think of the FX every time I see a new Santa Fe coming toward me. The old Santa Fe–now that was an SUV I never liked the looks of.

    Feel free to compare the MKX and Pacifica if you want to. I like em-kay-edge. Good one.

  • avatar
    Brian E

    Yes, but how does this compare to the new Cadalacura CLRSMKRDX? Inquiring minds want to know!

  • avatar
    Seth

    I think they should have taken the concepts (both Ford and Lincoln’s) and should have made their fusions/MK?

    Atleast the concepts looked aggressive and had some testosterone to them. But the Fusion/Edge/MKX ? Yeesh… I wouldnt touch em even with a 9 foot pole. Too feminine if you ask me.

    Beyond that there is something about a Ford/Lincoln that doesnt interest me imagewise. Think Honda and how they built their image around robot/hondajet/electric cars/bikes etc.

    Ford needs to register as first and foremost an Engineer’s company not that of marketing. Mix this match that.. While they are at it, why not shake up the emblem a bit. Make the logo more youthful. How hard is all this?

    BTW, whats with all the PAG bashing. Ford got all the technological know how and how about them Astons eh? arent they beautiful? Wonder how many Ford Execs are plowing in them…

    Anyways, dont be quick to knock other makes under Big 2.5 umbrellas. DaimlerChrysler has Mitsu to thank for their platforms and Volvo S40 is a lowly mazda3… Talk about fat profits without lifting a finger.

  • avatar
    Brian E

    Eh? The Volvo S40 shares a platform with the Mazda3. In execution it’s hardly similar at all. Have you driven both? (Dumb question; I’m sure you haven’t.)

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    Neverminding whether my statement is true or not, do you guys actually like the look of the FX?

    The front and rear faces are odd and almost creepy, but the proportions are wonderful. If the MKX had those dimensions…it would be a stunner.

    Then again, it would probably need a proper RWD chassis to have a hood that long. (cough-cough)

  • avatar

    I’ve driven both the Mazda3 and Volvo S40, and answered the obvious question here:

    http://www.epinions.com/content_133810458244

    In short, they feel nothing alike. Which isn’t necessarily a good thing for the Volvo.

  • avatar
    Steven T.

    To my eyes the FX starts off with a promising shape (the coke bottle look is timeless) but gets messed up in the overly aggressive execution of the front and rear.

    I suppose the proportions of a RWD-based SUV are pleasant enough, but doesn’t that driveline arrangement weigh a bit more than a FWD-based AWD system?

    Back to Lincoln: I’m concerned that all of the badge engineering has already effectively killed the brand’s equity. The luxury field is just too competitive to make such basic mistakes.

    Ford should know better. The main reason Lincoln has any gravitas at all as a luxury make dates back to the company’s heavy investments in the 1950s and 60s. Lincoln’s most iconic models, the 1956-57 Mark II and the 61-63 Continental, only reached classic status because Ford eschewed GM’s bottom-line approach to Cadillac, which in those days was merely a stretched and reskinned Chevy. The Mark II, in contrast, had its own decidedly advanced platform. The Continental was based off of the low-slung T-Bird platform, which was an early adopter of curved side glass. (The Continental was arguably the first mid-sized American luxury “sports” sedan.)

    It takes money to create industry-leading designs. If Ford doesn’t have it, then the company should be honest about that and downsize Lincoln to a near-luxury brand and kill Mercury. (I’m not convinced that dumping PAG is such a great idea given all of the money already invested in it, and the POTENTIAL of Jaguar.)

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    Jaguar’s had potential for over a decade: all the money invested is pretty much a sunk cost now. At some point Ford has to decide what’s best for the company and make some tough product decisions.

    But whatever that may be, the current crop of Lincolns and PAG’s offerings simply aren’t bringing home the bacon.

  • avatar

    This car just makes the case for killing Mercury even stronger.

  • avatar
    jthorner

    Another pathetic attempt by Ford. This vehicle could simply be the top trim level of the Edge.

    I’m certainly not about to trade my 1966 Jaguar Mark X in for one :). FoMoCo seems to have corporate amnesia about the fact that prior to 1967 many Jaguar sedans were name a Mark __ .

  • avatar

    Yeah, we all know that Ford is the ONLY company doing platform engineering and too-familiar styling.

    Well, except the Camry/Lexus ES, whcih did so for more than a decade without all the hacks I see Ford getting.

    For that matter, the majority of the Lexus vehicles since the Marque’s debut (minus the IS, LS, and SC) aren’t all that different. Funny how many people don’t care about that.

    Similarly, I know many people that aren’t thrilled with Acura because “why pay more money for what looks like an Accord?”. In Honda’s defense, when they do take a styling risk…well…there’s this sorta-kinda treuck thing….

    I thought the review was good, although the authors that are determined to remind the oft-reminded world about Ford’s platform engineering could pull it back a tad and focus on, y’know, driving dynamics more…and still have the connection mentioned.

    Sorry, but this is not limited to this site, and it’s on the far side of ridiculous how much Ford gets hacked on for something common throughout the industry.

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    Sorry, but this is not limited to this site, and it’s on the far side of ridiculous how much Ford gets hacked on for something common throughout the industry.

    Don’t worry, we certainly give it to everyone who deserves it. I haven’t driven the Ford edge, but it has the same engine, transmission, wheel/tire package and the same basic suspension…its gonna drive about the same.

    I’m not old enough to remember the “good old days” of Lincoln (even if I have a Mark VIII) but vehicles like the MKX gives me good reason to act like a grumpy old man. :-)

  • avatar

    I hadn’t noticed that much balance. Read the review of the Five Hundred and some others…the reviewer seems to have decided “yep, I hate it…guess I’ll get in and drive it now”.

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    I didn’t write that review, but I agree its important to take the reader through what you experienced while testing.

    Then again, that’s why we have reader comments. :-)

    Since you mentioned it, I drove a Montego and there’s little praise to give it. Nice ride, ok handling, ok materials, great trunk and a buzzy, underpowered motor.

    And its so boring inside and out there’s little to like. Ford, (esp Lincoln and Mercury) is dying for the passionate products they had 20 years ago.

  • avatar
    windnsea00

    How the designers find that a good looking car is beyond me.

  • avatar
    Lesley Wimbush

    Good review Saheev. Drove it this week at Ccoty and I agree with you on most points; interior is nice, although centre stack metal treatment is kind of weird. Nice to drive, handles well but the tranny is mush-mush-mushy and slow to shift. Great brakes.

  • avatar
    Dennis

    Lincoln should base their sedans on either a Jaguar or Volvo platform and not a Mazda. Leave the Fords and Mercury’s to ride on a Mazda platform. As far as SUV’s The Lincoln could use a Range Rover for its Navigator. and scrap the Lincoln Pickup.

    Maybe Lincoln needs a high end Minvan based off of a Volvo XC90, or maybe a Jaguar MinVan for those Soccer moms that need more then a Honda Minivan or ones that don’t like the big Lincoln Navigator.

    How about a Volvo c70 as a Lincoln also

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    The Volvo Lincoln is on its way. Hopefully it won’t be as lame as the Volvo Ford and Volvo Mercury.

    I’m still waiting for a Mustang Lincoln.

  • avatar
    Bill

    None of the comments seem to come from people who have driven either MKX or Edge. My wife and I are buying one of the 2 after eliminating all other crossovers for various reasons, mainly they all look alike and not big enough with leg or headroom for humans over 6′tall. After trying to convince ourselves the Edge a close enough equal to the MKX we decided to buy the MKX. It rides quieter and smoother,and the interior is more luxurious than the edge.The Ultimate package gives options Edge doesn’t even offer. To us it is worth $4k more than Edge, it is still $4k-$10k less than MDX,SRX,RX300,Infiniti Q whatevers,Benz’s,Pathfinders……

  • avatar
    jaymo

    The power liftgate, adaptive headlamps, heated and cooled front seats and heated rear seats are not available on the Edge. Interior quality is noticeably better in the Lincoln with a quieter ride. After strongly considering both the Edge and MKX as well as other vehicles including the MLK, X5, RX330, SRX, XC90 and MDX, the MKX emerged the winner. The looks have grown on us since we first started our search 3 months earlier. You’d have to spend 10k more to get something truly better when you subtract the foreign brand mystique, which really doesn’t set anyone apart these days, the MKX is really more unique. When the Edge is all over the place in the lowest level trim, you’ll be glad to be in the less seen Lincoln. Don’t overlook the 6yr/70,000 mile powertrain warranty, 4yr/50,000 mile bumper to bumper warranty and first 12 mos/15,000 mile service which are included in the price. The dealership and service experiences at Lincoln/Mercury are also (appropriately) worth the extra cost compared to the Ford experience.

  • avatar
    Mark

    Jaymo–agreed. After looking at several of the alternatives you describe—we boutgh an MKX as well. Build quality is excellent, the interior is luxurious, and I really the looks—the retro kennedy -esque continental grill is distinct. I for one could care less that it’s relative is the Edge—I like the MKX on its own merits and think it is worth the $4500 upcharge.

    In sum the MKX is a great car—much better than the X5 we traded in. If I can give one piece of advice to all—do not buy an X5 ! Like several other people I know that have had an X5—you will get to know your BMW service advisor by name.

  • avatar

    Yeah, I thought I would add our comments to this thread also. We test drove various crossover type vehicles from Cadillac, Lexus, Lincoln, Saab, Edge and Volvo. The infinity and murano seemed too fugly for us to consider ( personal preference =).

    The Cadillac was nice but around 5-10k more fully loaded. The Lexus was too much of a momma van though I do like Toyotas. We liked the MKX. The Saab and Volvo did not live up to their expectations. The interiors were BORING on them.

    The Edge seemed like a pretty good deal until we drove it. While it did have some of the features of the MKX, it felt like a cheap knockoff. The MKX was a lot quieter. The stereo in the MKX was awesome. The edge felt more like a typical suv while the MKX seemed to have a more sportier feel. Besides, the fully loaded Edge was around 38k which was really close to the 43k we were getting the MKX for.

    We ended up buying the MKX though it was probably the most expensive purchase I’ve made so far other than the condo!

  • avatar
    Mack

    Is it me or are most people just really negative and need to complain about anything. The MKX is a really nice buy and it’s way cheaper than the lexus comparison, and yes spend more than Edge because people buy image, thats why you buy Coke instead of no name. You drive a Lincoln not MKX, you drive a Lexus not a ES300. The whole thing is completely emotional, if you wanted to be logical you would be buying a mini-van. As far as someone saying earlier to stop the Lincoln LT, well I don’t know about you’re area but they sell easy enough where I live. And just try the two and come back here and tell me you dont like the MKX, what’s the difference anyways $100-$150 more a month thats all that $5000-$7000 more costs, thats a few coffee’s a month from starbucks.

  • avatar
    Mack

    Oh and think of it this way, your costs for work and replacement parts are going to be less since most Ford parts will be compatible, plus you don’t even have to pay for your oil changes when you buy Lincoln products. Why build it on the mazda 6 platform, because it’s damn good, that’s why.

  • avatar

    Ford’s Lincoln theory is easy to follow: Take that great Mazda CX-7 body/chassis, slick it up with a nice interior and tweak the styling and sell ‘em. Little did they realize at the time (’05) that this model would become a top choice in the SUV crossover competition. It is very nice on the highway. It is very safe to drive as a Lincoln should be: great handling, acceleration, stability … IMOP as good as the Beemer or the Benz.

  • avatar
    LW52463

    I LOVE MY EDGE FOR LESS $$. It has everything necessary for borderline luxury..I would rather have the Vista vs. dvd and nav. I’m going to put DVD in the large headrests, and have GPS on my blackberry, anyway. I am reading this review to see what I missed with my purchased, and I think that the mechanics are the same, so the trim options are the only thing lacking. I can forfeit that for now and can move up to Luxury at a later time if I find a few extra thousand to blow.
    I do miss….butt cooler and homelink.

  • avatar
    alpha94

    I drove one (2008) over the weekend and can say there’s a big difference between this and the Edge. You are paying for the much upgraded interior, power passenger seat, 20 inch rims, etc. For a few thousand more it’s the pasengers that will notice the difference more than the driver.


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