By on September 18, 2006

06lincolntowncar_03-1.jpg Ford’s in trouble. Headlines talks of cuts, cuts and more cuts; and new product that might bring the automaker back from the brink. Meanwhile, mad props are in order for the party responsible for not killing the venerable Lincoln Town Car. This website has long argued that Ford’s failing car business isn’t about new product. It’s about neglecting existing product. Whether or not a resurrected Town Car aids an ailing FoMoCo is an open question, but refraining from reinventing the wheel at every regime change is the short answer.

The original Town Car's architectural-grade sheetmetal met with approval from wannabe-Dolemites and Golden Girls. The current whip hosts a series of cartoonishly clumsy styling cliches on a bulbous, bloated body. The Town Car’s Cheshire cat grille and googly-eyed headlights elude style like Dennis Rodman in a Valentino tuxedo. Door handles lifted from a 1950's Frigidaire put function ahead of form, not to mention an inflated bustle sporting a sad array of across-the-pond design cues. Even with the right proportions and delicious dimensions, the American-hallmark of covered headlights, coffin noses and Continental kits are a thing of the past.

06lincolntowncar_07.jpgThe American Dream machine continues to disappoint within. The Town Car’s front and rear butt-cushions fall flat, sit short and sport the slipperiest hides this side of a live python. Where's the old school, pillow-topped, sit-in-not-on velour decadence? Mouse fur rugs replace yesteryear’s plush, shaggy carpets. The once brash and unabashed color palette makes way for shades of white-bread boredom. The entry-level CD stereo tries to reach higher and lower— and fails.  Other disappointments include an ashtray door that moves with all the arthritic fluidity of its core-clientele, and a front floormat small enough for a Toyota Yaris.

Contemplating the Town Car’s $43k asking price, its low rent Euro-style cuts to the bone. Still, the Town Car is no Corolla. Soft touch plastics perfectly complement its wood-effect trim, white LED lighting, fake nickel and frosted-bronze accents. The Lincoln’s interior may not give German car lovers a reason to linger, but it doesn't feel like a beat-up Manhattan-crazed taxicab either (even when it is). And the domestic barge’s rear storage compartment is enormous; suitable transport for full grown quadruplets awaiting cement shoe fitment.

06lincolntowncar_10222.jpg Fire up the Town Car and the American dream leaves the retirement home; dual exhausts burble while the (pathetically small) hood ornament gets its shine on. The analog tachometer is a long-delayed, much appreciated addition, providing visual reinforcement of the 4.6-liter V8's hot-rod intake tenor. Though ancient, the big Lincoln’s powerplant is the automotive equivalent of the little black dress: an under-stressed engine with significantly more torque (287 ft.-lbs.) than horsepower (239hp). Take off is never less than smooth. Momentum is never less than serene.

Nimble its not, but it isn’t as lifeless as you’d imagine– for a vehicle that's only a hundred pounds lighter than a Ford Explorer.  The rack and pinion steering is over-boosted, but accurate. Rear wheel-drive balance serves massive doses of confidence, while the Watt's-link axle, monotube shocks and hydroformed chassis keep it flat enough for drivers looking to recreate 70’s cop show tire squealing understeer. Bell-bottomed pedestrians no longer fear the flying hubcap, as the Town Car’s 17” rims and prodigious disc brakes provide surprisingly competent stopping power.

To say the Town Car's basic blueprint has aged well is like calling Eleanor Roosevelt just another stand-up lady. But in today's highly competitive luxury car market, the Town Car's tuning package owns an uncomfortable middle ground. It’s not surprisingly limber like the mack-daddy Ford Police Interceptor, and not stupid-plush like a proper Lincoln. Add in the Town Car’s dim-witted four-speed automatic and you have a severely flawed package. Therein lays the problem: instead of being true to itself, the Town Car tried to out-import its competitors.

tc460522.jpg Wrong answer. The Lincoln Town Car is the sole survivor of a generation of automobiles that ooze Americana like a juicy chomp into a fully-dressed hamburger. So why does the Town Car need more than one finger resting on the wheel? Where's the button-tufted seating? There’s only two ways for Lincoln to go here: WAY up market or back to its Earth Wind and Fire forefathers. We seriously question Ford’s ability to pull a Lexus out of its hat. Which leaves… playas.

Today’s homies empty their pocketbooks for the likes of Chrysler 300s and dub'd-out SUVs. This is the Town Car's rightful territory: rear-wheel drive machines with gangstolene style, epic space and a hint of grace. Now that their back’s against the wall, again, still, maybe Ford has the stones to put the real American Dream back on the road. Maybe it can change the Lincoln Town Car from an “old man’s car” to a “stickin’ it to da man" car.  We shall see.

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54 Comments on “Lincoln Town Car Review...”


  • avatar
    taxman100

    Love the Ford Panther platform, and the Town Car in particular. Alas, letting the international side of Ford run the car business the last decade or so has given us lameness where Ford should shine – a vehicle like the Town Car.

    The current Town Car is decked out like the Mercury Marquis of old – nice, but not Lincoln nice. All Ford automobiles suffer from cost cutting where it they think their buyers won’t notice – judging from sales, customers notice.

    The huge saving grace on the Town Car is they are from old school Ford, when they still had pride in their automobiles, so most of the damage could be easily fixed. That, and they flat out run forever.

    Town Car done right has zero competition. Whether Ford has a clue is anybody’s guess.

  • avatar
    doctorv8

    So the TC has been granted a stay of execution…great! Now c’mon Ford…Take Sajeev’s advice and bring back the plush lux, and throw in the updated 24 Valve 4.6/6 speed combo out of the Explorer…and while I’m wishing…make the Navigator/F150 5.4 tuned to 400 HP an option for the Touring model….which would be available as a coupe. ;-)

    Then I might just be able to recommend a Lincoln car to friends seeking buying advice. Been a long time since I’ve been able to do that.

  • avatar
    dolo54

    ahh you mentioned dolemite! that’s where i got ‘dolo’ from. but dolemite the pimp is spelled with an ‘e’… dolomite is a mineral. oh yeah every livery/car service driver in nyc has this car and only this car for some reason. it’s really not that nice. at $40 something k i would much prefer a 300.

  • avatar
    nweaver

    NOBODY buys a towncar at full price. Almost nobody buys them at all, except for fleet/driver usage. They are cheaper than the 300 for fleet/driver usage (the discount is huge), and they are the second best car (short of a Maybach) to get driven around in, with the huge back seat and trunk space for your shit.

    I think Ford is going to try to streach one or two more years until Daimler/Chrysler floods the market with 300 Longs, as much because until the 300 Long hits the market and is produced in numbers, there is NO other car in the TownCar’s Niche.

  • avatar

    My bad.

    Respect to the Dolomites!

  • avatar
    nweaver

    The reason why the Livery cars are all towncars…

    They are paying $30k or so, not retail.

    And there is nothing short of a maybach which has as ROOMY a backseat. At least until the 300 Long hits the market.

  • avatar
    doctorv8

    Too bad most TC’s are not of the extended wheelbase variety…and are surprisingly tight in the back seat for a car of that size.

  • avatar
    PandaBear

    Since most TC are driven by professional driver, fixing the ride, interior, handling, and exterior should be the priority.

    Since the image of TC is already branded as a limo or high end fleet, there is no way to fix it but introduce another model to take the high end retail market. Or a completely redesigned model.

    This is the problem of the big 2.5, while they have the $ to redesign products, they haven’t. Now they have to thin their budget to redesign every single model in their line up, and they can’t afford to.

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    taxman: I too think that the Panther platform is the only reason Ford’s cost cutting (during the Nasser Era) hasn’t killed the Townie. You can’t beancount the wholesome engineering out of this chassis.

    doc: I almost expect the Explorer (or 5-speed auto from Mustang GT) combo in the Town Car when the Panthers get updated in 2009. (cough cough) Bring back the Signature Touring model too, and give it the full CVPI suspension package. That’ll be an instant hit.

    dolo: my bad. I musta let Spell Check change that one on accident!

    nweaver: got a point about the backseat. But I wonder about the LWB LX Chryslers: those trunks are not livery friendly. Too short, kinda shallow. I donno how many fleet buyers are gonna jump on that bandwagon, especially since the LWB Townies fix that problem and come with the best trunk on the planet.

    PandaBear: Yup, the Town Car won’t be the flagship, per se. Sure its the Lincoln with the V8 and the American proportions, but the MKS will probably be the flagship. It will be like the 1980s when there was a Fairmont/Taurus-based Continental at the top of the food chain.

    And that may not be a bad thing: back in 1988, Ford couldn’t make the V6 flagship Continental fast enough to meet demand for the entire year. Nothing wrong with a V6 Lincoln ruling the roost.

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    Oh, and lets hope the redesign loses the goofy Lincoln LS grille and puffy sheetmetal.

  • avatar
    starlightmica

    Maybe the reskin will look like the 2002 Continental Concept – that’s a design that really ought not be be wasted, suicide doors and goofy power trunk be damned. And since it’s a livery car, make the back seat more luxurious, like Maybach on the cheap.

    http://www.auto123.com/en/info/news/prototype,view,Lincoln.spy?artid=15872&pg=1

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    Thank goodness I’m not the only one who never forgot about that concept car…Ford could make this car 10 years from now and it still won’t look dated.

    Stupid-awesome 2002 Continental Concept pics here

  • avatar
    doctorv8

    Damn, between those 2002 pics and the 2003 Ford 427 concept….it makes me sick how great Ford sedans could have been by now.

  • avatar
    Scottie

    ONe could only hope for the Return of the Velour Seats.

    I jsut hope they still offer a Bill Blass edition….

  • avatar
    Jordan Tenenbaum

    I thought the Em Kay Es was going to replace the Town Car, with the TC going to sleep with the fish?

  • avatar
    ktm

    The 2002 TC concept looks like a 300L. If it ever makes production, it will be nothing more than a me-too pimp mobile like the HHR is to the PT Cruiser.

  • avatar
    doctorv8

    Except it came first.

  • avatar
    ktm

    Yes, but it was never built. Big difference. Ford is, as they say, a day late and a dollar short.

    It’s 2006 now and the car was a 2002 concept. Ford had 4 years to manufacture the car. Most consumers are not going to remember the concept car. They will simply see a “re-badged” 300.

    Is that a bad thing? Not necessarily, but think of the success that Ford missed not producing it.

  • avatar
    pharmer

    A Pearl White 2006 Town Car was the best rental car I’ve ever driven. I fell in love with that beast during the 4 days that I had it! I absolutely agree that it’s begging for a bit more bling, a more refined powertrain, and some updates to the chassis.

    Even as they sit today, the long-haul comfort is absolutely epic….the miles just melted away, and I often found myself cruising at a comfortable 80-85 mph. And what about the trunk? You could put a VW Beetle in that sucker and still have room for an overnight bag.

    With a few changes I’d be heading down to the Lincoln dealer. Honestly. I never thought I’d say that, but love does funny things.

  • avatar
    JSForbes

    Wow, that Continental looks awesome. That’s the sad part about ford and GM today. They clearly have talented designers and engineers, too bad that talent never seems to meet the road.

  • avatar
    2006300c

    Imagine if all that money spent on British Leyland err I mean, PAG was spent on Lincoln, a full-sized car and sport sedan platform and improved materials.

    This could’ve been the New LS
    http://www.conceptcarz.com/vehicle/z3567/Lincoln_MK%209/default.aspx

    This Infiniti M45 Rip-off with its wimpy V6 is deplorable and shows what’s wrong with Fomoco. They exist in a bubble. A dull conservative cowardly bubble at that.

    http://www.conceptcarz.com/vehicle/z10840/Lincoln_MKS/default.aspx

  • avatar
    starlightmica

    I thought the Em Kay Es was going to replace the Town Car, with the TC going to sleep with the fish?

    A vehicle codenamed E386 was in development, a flagship V8 AWD sedan that shared the D3 platform with the MKS. I think it was supposed to be a TC replacement, but canned due to lack of funds.

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    The MKS is still on track for production, it is a Lincoln LS replacement. Going rumor is it’s D3 based, has a 3.7L direct injected twin turbo motor with over 350hp and AWD. Which is fine and dandy, but it needs to be called a Continental instead.

  • avatar
    willbodine

    It would be interesting to hear from some Ford “insiders” just why the corporate culture doesn’t seem to care about product development after a new model is launched.
    The sad, sad history of Lincoln is especially heartbreaking (and not likely to turnaround soon: has anyone seen the mind-bogglingly ugly ’07 Navigator??) And yet in cities around the world, the wedding limo of choice is most likely to be a white Town Car stretch- even in RHD places like London, Sydney and Tokyo. I rented a TC last summer from Hertz, a black LWB sedan. I liked it more than I thought I would. For a body-on-frame it was rigid as hell. Drivetrain was smooth, reasonably powerful and I got 26-27 mpg hwy. The main negatives were the poor fake wood, no tach and unsupportive seats. Plus the ugly front and rear styling.
    I have never understood why Ford hasn’t given i.r.s. to this platform. They saw the ride and packaging advantages irs gave to their large suvs. I would imagine the system from the last four-passenger T-Bird could be adapted. It might allow them to finally re-design the fuel tank that has caused so many police Crown Vic fires.
    Add new front and rear clips and voila a new lease on life for the old trooper.

  • avatar
    allen5h

    I can remember reading in a Car magazine on or about 1984 or 1985 about how the FoMoCo was making a $5,000 profit on their Town Cars. In 1986 I started to work for Avis rent a car at Dallas Fort Worth International in Texas. The mechanics at Avis where telling me that when they had these cars up on a lift for oil changes they could see the spot welding on the frames coming apart. I also remember when we where prepping brand new Town Cars into the fleet. The electric windows would only work intermittently.

    For this the FoMoCo was getting a $5,000 reward per copy?

    No wonder why Toyota started Lexus.

    But that was twenty years ago. For the FoMoCo’s sake, I sure hope they have worked these bugs out of their Town Cars by now.

  • avatar
    Stephan Wilkinson

    Why would you need a tachometer on a car with an automatic transmission? To tell you the engine is running?

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    willbodine: I think IRS is a great idea for a Town Car, not so much for the Crown Vic. The solid axle works wonders for police and taxi fleets, and with the Watt’s Link (wisely added in 1998) it stays planted in most any condition you’d wanna throw at this beast. And if it keeps the costs down to make room for better interior goodies, so be it…its good enough.

    allen5h: It was more like $10,000 a unit, they made 1 billion dollars on one year of Town Car sales back then. Never knew those bugs on the older ones (my aunt has a 1988 model, its pretty much bulletproof) but the newer cars have a hydroformed subframe (not gonna see any welds while changing oil) and seem to do well reliability and customer satisfaction wise.

  • avatar
    ktm

    Stephan, this argument applies to the more ‘sporty’ makes and models with automatic transmissions: many modern sport mode automatics do not automatically shift when they hit the redline. You must ‘manually’ shift the car.

    However, in the TC and cars of its genre, I agree that a tachometer is rather superfluous.

  • avatar
    doctorv8

    I’ve appreciated tachs, and full gauges for that matter, in all my automatic cars, Stephan. Just because I’m not shifting doesn’t mean I don’t want to know what rpm the car is shifting at or cruising at.

    Granted, the average TC buyer won’t care, but the fact that the tach has finally showed up hopefully portends more enthusiast oriented hardware in the future.

  • avatar
    Terry Parkhurst

    Your review is a nice piece of work, Sajeev. I especially liked “this powerplant is the automotive equivalent of the little black dress.” In a way, this piece relates to Robert’s about limos – to my mind, anyway. Several times in my life, I have been fortunate enough to ride in Lincoln Town Cars that were serving as limos, for commercial limo services. Once, as I recall, i was in a back seat, three across in a Lincoln Town Car; and it still felt quite comfortable.
    There was an article in the NY Times last week that said Ford plans to kill the Town Car, after the 2007 model year; and close down the Wixom, Michigan plant where they are built. I think that is about as dumb as it gets. Maybe Mr. Mulally will get a clue and reverse that order.

  • avatar
    Terry Parkhurst

    Minor correction to last post: Last sentence in first ‘graph should read, “Once, as I recall, I was in a back seat, etc. etc.”

  • avatar
    Alcibiades

    Good review Sajeev, as usual. I agree that the Panther is an excellent platform, and Ford should stick with it for awhile. It is unique, and while it has its drawbacks, it also has significant advantages. With a new engine, new transmission, and better interior, the Town Car could be a viable alternative in many applications. And its not like Ford has many alternatives.

  • avatar
    allen5h

    Sajeev Mehta thanx for the link to the TC concept car!

    Great pics!

    A suicide doors TC would be awesome. It really opens up the interior unlike any car, and makes the interior look 50% bigger than what it is, and the interior is already very big. However, it would not be possible to build this b/c of the loss of rigidity without the center post. (Hey, it’s just a concept.)

    The proportions of this sheet metal and a big V-8 RWD would give the 300C some real competition.

    I do not think the new CEO can build it. First of all, he has got to take Ford into bankruptcy, and bring out with a new “car passion” corporate culture. Second, he is not young enough to do the bankruptcy and the radical redesigns and see these things through completion. And third, (even if he was young enough) he’s got the Ford family Dodo bird hovering over his head, they won’t let him do anything. The Ford family will eventually give up control, but not before a few more CEO cycles.

  • avatar
    poozinsc

    I was watching a football game Sunday when an automobile commercial came on. It was sort of cool — it was all of the models of the particular brand moving in shilouette (sp?) — then I realized that I didn’t recognize a SINGLE one of the cars. Not a one…

    The line being advertised — Lincoln. Later in the day I saw an older Town Car. There was no doubt what it was — distinct and easily recognizable.

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    Stephan: I’m sure fleet buyers of the Crown Vic were thrilled to have a Tach (not to mention muscle car fans looking for a partner for their Impala SS) and it only makes sense to give the Townie what the Ford has.

    Terry: Its already been done. Last Friday Ford reported they will move Townie production to their Crown Vic plant in Canada, its saved and will more than likely see a redesign in 2009, as that’s when the CV is slated for one.

    I’ve been in a Limo once, it was a Town Car. I liked it, except I could hear the driver flooring it (4-2 downshifts) all the damn time. It smelled fine though.

    poozinsc: That ad was part of my motivation to say the Town Car is an “American Dream”. To promote a Japanese (MKZ, MKX) or Swedish (MKS) chassis as part of the American Dream (their latest tagline) without even mentioning the real deal (Townie) is downright shameful.

    As you said, the only Lincoln-Mercury car with instant brand recognition is the Townie. A freshman business student understands that much about product promotion and marketing, but Lincoln obviously doesn’t get it. Shameful.

  • avatar
    taxman100

    With Ford cutting production like crazy, a “niche” platform like the Panther that will still sell 200,000 units a year at a profit after a decade of neglect starts to sound pretty good.

    I’ve heard rumors they are looking at moving Ranger production to Crown Vic plant – it could become like the island of misfit toys for neglected Ford products.

    If they only spent a fraction on the panther that they spent on the Five Hundred, they would be much further ahead.

  • avatar
    willbodine

    Sajeev Mehta: Point taken about the police/taxi preference for solid axle RWD. Of course they would balk at IRS, they have rarely (if ever) been offered it. If Independent Front Suspension can be made reasonably durable (and it is) so too could a properly designed IRS. Personally, the engineering elegance of IRS is what appeals to me. Bolting the differential to the frame eliminates beaucoup unsprung weight and frees up valuable underbody space at the rear that can be used for fuel, cargo or back seat room. Ford knows this because of the new Expedition and Explorer.

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    Will: I do agree with you that IRS is a good idea for the Lincoln Town Car. Considering Ford had the stones to put it on their SUVs when nobody else does (even Toyota) I know it can be made to work. Heck use the same design as the Mark VIII and even the rear air springs are good to go for Limo duty.

    But I betcha that police/taxi guys will dislike it: it will raise the MSRP and require more maintenance after rough use. No way a half-shaft, U-joint, misc. brackets is gonna out-tough a solid axle. After seeing how many curbs those Manhattan Taxicabs hit, I’m pretty sure its the best for the job.

    Crown Vic = Watts Link
    Town Car = IRS

    That would be nice.

  • avatar
    DaveClark

    This is not a “stick it to the man car.” It has about as much appeal as a AARP card to a Baby Boomer (you’ve arrived: you’re now officially OLD).

    The QOTD is: What needs carbon dating more, Buick or Lincoln?

  • avatar
    HEATHROI

    Ok how about this replacement for the old Panther dinosaur and the stupid 500.

    http://www.ford.com.au/servlet/ContentServer?cid=1137385365703&pagename=Page&c=DFYPage

    and where else are you going to find four litre straight six turbo? and ford aready makes it.

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    Ford is talking about bringing the Falcon here, but it probably won’t replace the Panther dinosaur. We can only hope it will happen, and kill off the 500.

    Nice as it is, the Falcon isn’t born to shuttle old people/wannabe pimps/cops/taxi drivers like the Panther.

  • avatar
    NickR

    That 2002 Continental Concept was/is gorgeous. It could have been to Lincoln what the 300 was to Chrysler. Actually better. I don’t know why the Big 2.5 fritter away their time on these thrilling designs only to leave them on the shelf, while turning out monotonous and/or dated designs year after year. I think that design, if backed by suitable powertrain, would vault Lincoln back into a the lead of the big, luxury sedan market. In the meantime, I will have to settle in to the back seat for my ride to the airport.

  • avatar
    Alcibiades

    I just got back from a 1,000 mile driving trip between Albuquerque, New Mexico and Meade, Kansas in a rented 2007 Town Car Signature. It was not a sports car in any respect, but was a great highway cruiser–very quiet, enough power, the patented panther platform ride, and 25 mpg. On the way back I drove over 17 miles of dirt/gravel road (a New Mexico state highway no less) with no hesitation. The platform and the extra clearance from the big tires make you feel you can take the Town Car places you would never take a DTS, Lucerne, or Lexus. Underneath the bloated body there is still an indestructible chassis. So, while I agree with most of Sajeev’s criticisms, there is still something about the Town Car that is unique, and good. I think all us Pather platform lovers are harsh about the current offerings because they could have been so much better if Ford hadn’t been asleep at the switch for the last 10 years.

  • avatar

    I just rented one and the interior was definitely cheap in comparison to the Avalon that I also rented. I also didn’t get anywhere close to 25 MPG. It was a decent car but the Avalon was a better car. There is no way a Toyota is supposed to be better than a Lincoln but that’s the problem these days. Thanks to the mismanagement at Ford.

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    I think all us Pather platform lovers are harsh about the current offerings because they could have been so much better if Ford hadn’t been asleep at the switch for the last 10 years.

    Well said. Not just better, but also they’d have a chance at being competitive in the world of large FWD, V6 luxury imports.

  • avatar
    rick la komy

    We just purchased a 2007 Signature L, Black on Black (our first Lincoln). You talk about a roomy Automobile, this one has room for everyone to stretch out and enjoy the ride. Quite attractive inside too, with all the copper nickel accents everywhere, the Lincoln logo on the carpets, and it’s quiet inside. We’ve been getting about 25 MPG on the highway even with that extra 6″ added to the rear passenger section. Should get better after we get a few miles on it. One thing I really like is the rear park assist. Without it I’d probably have run over a few things by now. I have considered replacing the Michelins with something that will give a softer ride around town though, with what I don’t know yet.

  • avatar
    CocoaFL

    I suspect that almost none of the reviewers here are 55+/retired. I am, and I’m probably dead-center in the target market. The Town Car has a highly loyal base among the silver-haired set and there is nothing to replace it at anywhere near the price. Do I care about “sporty handling” any longer? No. I want to drive a sofa with a transmission. And that’s exactly what the TC has been and hopefully will continue to be.

    Sure there are some shortcomings. The oddest is that navigation is not available in the Signature series. Memory seats should be standard. The ashtray should be replaced by (at least optionally) decent, sturdy cupholders. The newer 6-speed transmission would be a plus, but I’d keep the tried and true 4.6 engine. Over the course of driving a half-dozen Town Cars, all but one got at least 25 MPG on the road, all the time. One, a rental, got 28-29 with cruise on at a steady 72, another got in the low 20s. But that’s pretty decent gas mileage for a whale.

    I’ve sat in the big Lexus and it just feels smaller. Ditto for the Mercs. Frankly, so does the DTS and it also feels lower and therefore more difficult for an oldster to get in and out of. Finally, many old people do not care for vehicles with a center console.

    The Town Car is as much luxury as I can afford, and I’ll keep buyi8ng them as long as they are produced.

  • avatar
    rick la komy

    I never really considered myself in the target market for this type of car, even though I am. What we wanted was a big, roomy, comfortable car that we could depend on. We put 240,000 miles on a 89′ Volvo 740 that gave us virtually no trouble at all. It just got to be too rough of a ride for me, which was the reason we gave it away after putting new brakes and tires, also having it re-painted and fixing the interior including the headliner and a new windsheild. We looked at a new Volvo but it has been down sized to a mid size car. We tried a new Buick Lucerne CXS, but it had problems so GM bought it back. And that leaves out a Cadillac, as it’s just an expensive Buick. I’m trying to buy American but the Luxury sedan’s just aren’t available. Forget about a SUV cause their just too tall. I’m only 188 lb’s and my wife is small, but come on, who wants to be crammed into mid size car and expect to be comfortable? Seems like everyone is being programmed to squeeze into what ever is available to them. Don’t get me wrong, I have a
    C-5 Corvette I drive around and really enjoy and there isn’t much room in that. It’s made to be sporty, fast and have things right at your fingertips. Lets just hope that Lincoln keeps a Luxury sedan in production.

  • avatar
    arichboylincoln

    June 01,2007
    My second Lincoln Town Car (Last one an 04)
    After 38 New Cars, including 4 New Cadillacs,
    I personally find the 06 Town Car appealing,but
    never exciting. Ford products after about 18 months of driving all feel and act the same-
    moderately dull. Lincoln TC feel more and more like a Crown Vic should be, not like a Lincoln should be. In an ailing company they still need to upgrade the Lincoln or close the company (Ford Corp.)
    Nice car, like it, but truly dull.
    Until they do something about excessive depreciation no American car will ever hold long term appeal nor loyalty.
    I’m all for American Car companies succeeding but they really need to wake up dull products.
    Maybe I should get invloved in their design and quality divisions??!!
    It wouldn’t hurt!
    R McMillan
    Oxford, NC

  • avatar
    Big Jack

    I just bought a new designer series town car and it is fabulous. I don’t know what everyone is so apoligetic about. I test drove the cad dts, infinity g45, toyota avalon and a 2003 BMW seven series (I loved the car, but I read how many times it’s owners had the car in the shop). The town car is head and sholders above all of these cars. I am pleased with it. By the way, I haven’t seen a BMW, Toyota, Infinity, Lexus or volvo Limo. This car is white choclate and, have I mentioned that it is fabulous, $10K off, none of the other overpriced light weights could compare. And I am very happy that I am retired, don’t have to put up with the corporate BS any more, live on my investments, and travel in this new beauty. Cheers, hopefully you can enjoy live as I do
    Big Jack

  • avatar
    Big Jack

    oh by the way, I forgot to mention that my other car is another “dull” ford, it’s an SVT mustang cobra and it sure fills my desire for that extra kick. Pampered in the town car, and wild as hell in the cobra. What’s the problem with american cars, they’re the only one’s I’ll buy

  • avatar
    TODDK5250

    O.K., can anyone else beat the shit out of my car !! Have you looked at the Cadillac lately?
    Yes, Lincoln does need to refine some details, and I’m sure with these comments they will.
    If ya don’t like the TC, you should have driven and tested every syllable of it. If ya didn’t, I’m laughing all the way to my new 2008.

  • avatar
    rick la komy

    Well, we have been enjoying our Towncar for about a year now and have had no problems until yesterday when I turned off the ignition for a few minutes and when I re-started it and put it in gear the engine stalled and continued to do so about six or so times before I was able to drive away. Is anybody familiar with this? We only have 8,000 or so miles and use Chevron.


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